John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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it was reported in that the time was set for them to burn  that place, and many left it for a short time; but this, I think, was  incorrect.
Shortly after the Mormon troops came from , they received  news that a company was gathered on , and that some  of them had been to some houses on Log creek, in , and or dered off the families, with severe threats if they were not off by sun rise the next morning. They took away their arms, and, it was said,  also burnt a wagon and a house, and took three men prisoners. On  receiving this news, a company was fitted out to disperse them. Capt.  Fear-not () commanded them. They went in the  night to the house of Fields [John Field], on , but not finding the  company there they proceeded to another place, and had not pro ceeded far till they met with a centinel, who hailed them, and after  a word or two shot one of them down, and then ran to his company;  but they followed him up in a hurry, and after a fire or two, charged  on the company, and soon dispersed them, and supposed they had  killed several. They then gathered up a part of the plunder, and  about thirty horses, and returned, leaving one of their men dead on  the ground, though they did not miss him till they had got home.  Three or four others were badly wounded, and and one other  died soon. One of the opposite party was killed and others wound ed.
This battle produced great excitement among the people, and the  Mormons found in a day or two that it was militia instead of a mob that  they had assailed. had collected a company and got  permission to guard Buncum, and was there encamped for that pur pose when they fell on him. The excitement increased rapidly, and  in a day or two the whole country, seemingly, was in arms. At this  I was greatly alarmed, for I expected the people would turn out en masse against , without order or regulation, and massacre  and destroy without mercy, and that nothing could stop them. I tried  to contrive some plan to get away with my family, but I could not  effect it. , , and some others, made their escape  in the night, with their families, but were followed the next day by  twenty horsemen from without success.
The Mormons were still collected at and at , and a small company also collected at Hawn’s Mill, who lived  in that section of country. seeing the tumult and  uproar, called out the militia. The news of this pleased me, for I  thought that if they turned out under authority they would of course  observe good order; and it was also stated that ’s  object was to investigate the affair, and bring the guilty to punish ment, and rescue the innocent. I was informed that the Mormons at  Hawn’s mill made a covenant with the other citizens to let each other  alone, and the Mormons were to remain at the mill. But in a short  time two or three companies of militia came upon them, from what  cause I know not. A battle was the result, and some twenty or thir ty Mormons were killed, but none of the militia, as I heard, but some  wounded. There were different reports about the number killed, but [p. 39]
it was reported in that the time was set for them to burn that place, and many left it for a short time; but this, I think, was incorrect.
Shortly after the Mormon troops came from , they received news that a company was gathered on , and that some of them had been to some houses on Log creek, in , and ordered off the families, with severe threats if they were not off by sunrise the next morning. They took away their arms, and, it was said, also burnt a wagon and a house, and took three men prisoners. On receiving this news, a company was fitted out to disperse them. Capt. Fear-not () commanded them. They went in the night to the house of Fields [John Field], on , but not finding the company there they proceeded to another place, and had not proceeded far till they met with a centinel, who hailed them, and after a word or two shot one of them down, and then ran to his company; but they followed him up in a hurry, and after a fire or two, charged on the company, and soon dispersed them, and supposed they had killed several. They then gathered up a part of the plunder, and about thirty horses, and returned, leaving one of their men dead on the ground, though they did not miss him till they had got home. Three or four others were badly wounded, and and one other died soon. One of the opposite party was killed and others wounded.
This battle produced great excitement among the people, and the Mormons found in a day or two that it was militia instead of a mob that they had assailed. had collected a company and got permission to guard Buncum, and was there encamped for that purpose when they fell on him. The excitement increased rapidly, and in a day or two the whole country, seemingly, was in arms. At this I was greatly alarmed, for I expected the people would turn out enmasse against , without order or regulation, and massacre and destroy without mercy, and that nothing could stop them. I tried to contrive some plan to get away with my family, but I could not effect it. , , and some others, made their escape in the night, with their families, but were followed the next day by twenty horsemen from without success.
The Mormons were still collected at and at , and a small company also collected at Hawn’s Mill, who lived in that section of country. seeing the tumult and uproar, called out the militia. The news of this pleased me, for I thought that if they turned out under authority they would of course observe good order; and it was also stated that ’s object was to investigate the affair, and bring the guilty to punishment, and rescue the innocent. I was informed that the Mormons at Hawn’s mill made a covenant with the other citizens to let each other alone, and the Mormons were to remain at the mill. But in a short time two or three companies of militia came upon them, from what cause I know not. A battle was the result, and some twenty or thirty Mormons were killed, but none of the militia, as I heard, but some wounded. There were different reports about the number killed, but [p. 39]
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