John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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troops, and that whatever abuse was practised on the Mormons ought  to have been charged on the individuals that did it, and not upon the  officers or community at large. It was said that women were insulted  and even ravished, but I doubt the truth of the latter. Some were in sulted; yet, as soon as the officers were informed, they set guards to  prevent further insult. Two men that were taken prisoners were  struck on the head, one was badly hurt and the other killed. The  man who killed him accused him of having abused his family and burn ed his house; but on returning home he found his house had not been  burned at all. Why he was not committed for trial, I never knew.  Many others were taken prisoners, but generally were well treated  and set free without injury. There was much corn, cattle, fodder,  &c., used for the army, but the officers said the would pay for  it. There were some instances of soldiers shooting cattle, hogs and  sheep, merely for sport, when they did not want them for food, but  this, I understood, was contrary to the officers orders. There were  also several cases in which persons were plundered of horses and  other property, even clothing and furniture out of houses, by the sol diers, but they alledged that they were looking after and getting their  property back which had been taken from them. I have been told that  the same has been practised, more or less, by companies passing  through the , since the troops have been withdrawn. Others,  to whom they were indebted, have taken their property for debts,  until they are literally stripped, and are at this time in a miserable,  destitute situation. The Legislature, on hearing of their situation, ap propriated $2,000 for their relief, as well as for the relief  of the destitute in . A number of the Mormons met, and ap pointed a committee who drew up a petition in their behalf, to the  Legislature, setting forth a short history of their difficulties, from their  first settlement in to the present time, and praying  the Legislature to rescind the ’s exterminating order, under  which they were compelled to leave the , and also release them  from the deed of trust made in duress; pay them for their arms or re turn them, and pay them for their arms taken from them, as well as  other damages sustained by them in , and let them  have the privilege of living in the . (When took  their arms in , he agreed to return them as soon as they left  the , but this he refused to do even on the ’s order for  them.) Some two hundred families have left , and  others are preparing to go, but some are desirous to stay in the ;  and their object in getting up the petition was to be relieved from their  expelling contract, so that men should not have the privilege of abus ing them under a legal pretence, thinking it was right because they  agreed to leave the state, though that contract was strictly illegal.  This petition I presented to the Legislature on the 19th December. It  produced some excitement in the House and was laid on the table for  the present. [p. 44]
troops, and that whatever abuse was practised on the Mormons ought to have been charged on the individuals that did it, and not upon the officers or community at large. It was said that women were insulted and even ravished, but I doubt the truth of the latter. Some were insulted; yet, as soon as the officers were informed, they set guards to prevent further insult. Two men that were taken prisoners were struck on the head, one was badly hurt and the other killed. The man who killed him accused him of having abused his family and burned his house; but on returning home he found his house had not been burned at all. Why he was not committed for trial, I never knew. Many others were taken prisoners, but generally were well treated and set free without injury. There was much corn, cattle, fodder, &c., used for the army, but the officers said the would pay for it. There were some instances of soldiers shooting cattle, hogs and sheep, merely for sport, when they did not want them for food, but this, I understood, was contrary to the officers orders. There were also several cases in which persons were plundered of horses and other property, even clothing and furniture out of houses, by the soldiers, but they alledged that they were looking after and getting their property back which had been taken from them. I have been told that the same has been practised, more or less, by companies passing through the , since the troops have been withdrawn. Others, to whom they were indebted, have taken their property for debts, until they are literally stripped, and are at this time in a miserable, destitute situation. The Legislature, on hearing of their situation, appropriated $2,000 for their relief, as well as for the relief of the destitute in . A number of the Mormons met, and appointed a committee who drew up a petition in their behalf, to the Legislature, setting forth a short history of their difficulties, from their first settlement in to the present time, and praying the Legislature to rescind the ’s exterminating order, under which they were compelled to leave the , and also release them from the deed of trust made in duress; pay them for their arms or return them, and pay them for their arms taken from them, as well as other damages sustained by them in , and let them have the privilege of living in the . (When took their arms in , he agreed to return them as soon as they left the , but this he refused to do even on the ’s order for them.) Some two hundred families have left , and others are preparing to go, but some are desirous to stay in the ; and their object in getting up the petition was to be relieved from their expelling contract, so that men should not have the privilege of abusing them under a legal pretence, thinking it was right because they agreed to leave the state, though that contract was strictly illegal. This petition I presented to the Legislature on the 19th December. It produced some excitement in the House and was laid on the table for the present. [p. 44]
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