John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 78
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, together and  told them the what the ’s order and   required. Smith said  if it was the ’s order they would  submit and the Lord would take care  of them. So we hurried with them as  fast as possible to the place appointed.  We met with his army  but a short distance from town, he  had made every arrangement to surround  and destroy the Far place. But the prisoners  delivered themselves up and with the army and prisoners  returned to their camp. These prisoners  were to be retained as hostages till morning  and then if they did not agree to the proposal  they were to be set at liberty again, I suppose  they agreed to the proposals, for they were not set  at liberty. Next morning  marched his army near to town and Marched out the Mormons who  gave up their arms about six hundred  guns beside sword and pistols, and surr endered themselves as prisoners. I would  here remark that a few days previous  to this, news had frequently come to   that they were soon to be  attacted and destroyed  so the of the county court had  ordered with the militia to  guard the against invasions. they They  turned out and organized under this order  and in this situation surrendered to . was sent to  A guard was place[d] around to  keep all things secure, and with an army was sent to [p. 78]
, together and told them what the ’s order and required. Smith said if it was the ’s order they would submit and the Lord would take care of them. So we hurried with them as fast as possible to the place appointed. We met with his army but a short distance from town, he had made every arrangement to surround and destroy the place. But the prisoners delivered themselves up and with the army and prisoners returned to their camp. These prisoners were to be retained as hostages till morning and then if they did not agree to the proposal they were to be set at liberty again, I suppose they agreed to the proposals, for they were not set at liberty. Next morning marched his army near to town and Marched out the Mormons who gave up their arms about six hundred guns beside sword and pistols, and surrendered themselves as prisoners. I would here remark that a few days previous to this, news had frequently come to that they were soon to be attacted and destroyed so the of the county court had ordered with the militia to guard the against invasions. They turned out and organized under this order and in this situation surrendered to . A guard was placed around to keep all things secure, and with an army was sent to [p. 78]
Page 78