John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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In a short time become a majority, and  of course rule the . The church  kept increasing, and the old citizens became  more and more dissatisfied, and from time  to time offered to sell their farms and  possessions. But the Mormons, though  desirous, were too poor to purchase  them. The feelings of the people were  became greatly exasperated in consequence  of the many falsehoods and evil reports  that were in constant circulation against  the church. Thus matters grew worse  and worse, untill the people arose in  their fury; and on the 20th. day of July  AD 1833, the citizens met at the  in , and appointed a committe[e]  who called upon six or seven of the  leading Mormons, and required them  to shut up all their work shops, their  , and their , and <agree to> leave  the . The Mormons required time  to give them an answer, but <they> would  grant but fifteen minutes. The Mormons  then refused to comply with their proposals,  and the committe then returned to the   where the people were assemb led, <and> related to them the answer of the Mormons.  They then took a vote to demolish the  , which they did immediate ly, and tar[r]ed and feathered the and  two one or two others, and appointed the 23d  to meet again and carry on the work  of destruction. The day arrived and the [p. 28]
a short time become a majority, and of course rule the . The church kept increasing, and the old citizens became more and more dissatisfied, and from time to time offered to sell their farms and possessions. But the Mormons, though desirous, were too poor to purchase them. The feelings of the people became greatly exasperated in consequence of the many falsehoods and evil reports that were in constant circulation against the church. Thus matters grew worse and worse, until the people arose in their fury; and on the 20th. day of July AD 1833, the citizens met at the in , and appointed a committee who called upon six or seven of the leading Mormons, and required them to shut up all their work shops, their , and their , and agree to leave the . The Mormons required time to give them an answer, but they would grant but fifteen minutes. The Mormons then refused to comply with their proposals, and the committe then returned to the where the people were assembled, and related to them the answer of the Mormons. They then took a vote to demolish the , which they did immediately, and tarred and feathered the and one or two others, and appointed the 23d to meet again and carry on the work of destruction. The day arrived and the [p. 28]
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