Journal, 1835–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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heard from , the voice of the  class was called to know, whether they considered  themselves any longer under obligation to you, and  whether they would wait any longer for you, and  carried in the negative.
Now sir, what could I say in your behalf? I  answer, nothing; I should have considered it an  insult to have asked 40 men who had laid by every  other consideration to attend this , to lay upon  their oars 3 days longer with the impression on their  minds, (and justly too) that it would be altogether  uncertain whether you would come then or not.
With these things lying before us, we are told by  your honour that it may be gratifying to small  minds to add insult to wrong; and you also informed  me in your note, that you was not unprepared  for the inteligence it contained, which is virtually  saying that you intended the abuse you have heaped  upon us.
I assure you sir that I have ever entertained the  best of feelings towards you, and have recognized you  as a friend in whom I could repose unlimited confid ence and whith whom I have acted in good faith,  and I am not a little surprized on this occasion,  that you should treat us with such marked contempt.  and then upbraid us with adding insult to wrong;  small as you may consider our minds, we have suffi cient discernment to discover this insult, although  offered by your honour, and sufficient good manners  not to insult or wrong any man.
Respectfully your most obedient humble servant
P.S. The note that we sent you, was well sealed when it  was put into the hands of the messenger; which you infor med me you recieved open,
Yours
[p. 130]
heard from , the voice of the class was called to know, whether they considered themselves any longer under obligation to you, and whether they would wait any longer for you, and carried in the negative.
Now sir, what could I say in your behalf? I answer, nothing; I should have considered it an insult to have asked 40 men who had laid by every other consideration to attend this , to lay upon their oars 3 days longer with the impression on their minds, (and justly too) that it would be altogether uncertain whether you would come then or not.
With these things lying before us, we are told by your honour that it may be gratifying to small minds to add insult to wrong; and you also informed me in your note, that you was not unprepared for the inteligence it contained, which is virtually saying that you intended the abuse you have heaped upon us.
I assure you sir that I have ever entertained the best of feelings towards you, and have recognized you as a friend in whom I could repose unlimited confidence and whith whom I have acted in good faith, and I am not a little surprized on this occasion, that you should treat us with such marked contempt. and then upbraid us with adding insult to wrong; small as you may consider our minds, we have sufficient discernment to discover this insult, although offered by your honour, and sufficient good manners not to insult or wrong any man.
Respectfully your most obedient humble servant
P.S. The note that we sent you, was well sealed when it was put into the hands of the messenger; which you informed me you recieved open,
Yours
[p. 130]
Page 130