Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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purpose of throwing us off our guard that they may thereby come unexpected and  kidnap Joseph and carry him to .
In consequence of President Joseph requesting to go and see him  that they might consult together &c. She concluded to go in the carriage. But  when the carriage was being got ready it attracted the attention of the Sheriff.  and they kept a strict watch for some time. Seeing the difficulty of getting  away undiscovered concluded to go on foot to ’s and  wait untill the carriage arrived. Accordingly the cover of the carriage being  folded up to shew the Sheriffs that she was not in &  started down the — called at Durphys and then proceeded down the  without being discovered. We went about 4 miles the road and then  turned off towards the Prarie. We went round the about 2 miles from  the outskirts and turned into the timber again opposite the Wiggans’ [Ebenezer Wiggins’s] farm  After we got within about a mile from left the  carriage and proceeded on foot. We soon arrived at and was  pleased to find President Joseph in good spirits, although somewhat sick.  The carriage returned home after we left it.
A report came over the that there is several small companies  of men in , Nashville, &c in search of Joseph. They saw  his horse go down the river yesterday and was confident he was on  that side. They swear they will have him. It is said there is a reward  of thirteen hundred dollars offered for the apprehension and delivery  of Joseph and and this is supposed to have induced them  to search viz. to get the reward.
The and have uttered heavy threats several times  saying that if they could not find Joseph they would lay the in ashes  They say they will tarry in the a month but they will find him.
14 August 1842 • Sunday
Sunday 14th. Spent the forenoon chiefly in conversation with on various subjects, and in  reading this history with her. Both felt in good spirits and were very chearful.  Wrote the following orders to Major Gen.l who was reported to be duly elected  to that office yesterday, as follows, viz.—
Head Quarters of Legion
Augt. 15— 1842
Dr General—
I take this opportunity to give you some  instructions how I wish you to act in case our persecutors should carry their  pursuits so far as to tread upon our rights as free-born American Citizens. The  orders which I am about to give you is the result of a long series of contemplation  since I saw you.— I have come fully to the conclusion both since this  last difficulty commenced, as before, that I never would suffer myself to go  into the hands of the Missourians alive; and to go into the hands of the Officers  of this state is nothing more nor less, than to go into the hands of the  Missourians; for the whole farce has been gotten up, unlawfully and  unconstitutionally, as well on the part of the as others; by a mob  spirit for the purpose of carrying out mob violence, to carry on mob tolerance  in a religious persecution. I am determined therefore, to keep out of their  hands, and thwart their designs if possible, that perhaps they may not  urge the necessity of force and blood against their own fellow-citizens and  loyal subjects; and become ashamed and withdraw their pursuits. But if they [p. 131]
purpose of throwing us off our guard that they may thereby come unexpected and kidnap Joseph and carry him to .
In consequence of President Joseph requesting to go and see him that they might consult together &c. She concluded to go in the carriage. But when the carriage was being got ready it attracted the attention of the Sheriff. and they kept a strict watch for some time. Seeing the difficulty of getting away undiscovered concluded to go on foot to ’s and wait untill the carriage arrived. Accordingly the cover of the carriage being folded up to shew the Sheriffs that she was not in & started down the — called at Durphys and then proceeded down the without being discovered. We went about 4 miles the road and then turned off towards the Prarie. We went round the about 2 miles from the outskirts and turned into the timber again opposite the Wiggans’ Ebenezer Wiggins’s farm After we got within about a mile from left the carriage and proceeded on foot. We soon arrived at and was pleased to find President Joseph in good spirits, although somewhat sick. The carriage returned home after we left it.
A report came over the that there is several small companies of men in , Nashville, &c in search of Joseph. They saw his horse go down the river yesterday and was confident he was on that side. They swear they will have him. It is said there is a reward of thirteen hundred dollars offered for the apprehension and delivery of Joseph and and this is supposed to have induced them to search viz. to get the reward.
The and have uttered heavy threats several times saying that if they could not find Joseph they would lay the in ashes They say they will tarry in the a month but they will find him.
14 August 1842 • Sunday
Sunday 14th. Spent the forenoon chiefly in conversation with on various subjects, and in reading this history with her. Both felt in good spirits and were very chearful. Wrote the following orders to Major Gen.l who was reported to be duly elected to that office yesterday, as follows, viz.—
Head Quarters of Legion
Augt. 15— 1842
Dr General—
I take this opportunity to give you some instructions how I wish you to act in case our persecutors should carry their pursuits so far as to tread upon our rights as free-born American Citizens. The orders which I am about to give you is the result of a long series of contemplation since I saw you.— I have come fully to the conclusion both since this last difficulty commenced, as before, that I never would suffer myself to go into the hands of the Missourians alive; and to go into the hands of the Officers of this state is nothing more nor less, than to go into the hands of the Missourians; for the whole farce has been gotten up, unlawfully and unconstitutionally, as well on the part of the as others; by a mob spirit for the purpose of carrying out mob violence, to carry on mob tolerance in a religious persecution. I am determined therefore, to keep out of their hands, and thwart their designs if possible, that perhaps they may not urge the necessity of force and blood against their own fellow-citizens and loyal subjects; and become ashamed and withdraw their pursuits. But if they [p. 131]
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