Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and beg you to spare me, and my helpless children. I beg you to spare  my innocent children the heartrending sorrow of again seeing their  father unjustly drag’ed to prison or to death. I appeal to your affections  as a son and beg you to spare our aged ,— the only surviving  parent we have left,— the unsupportable affliction of seeing her  son, who she knows to be innocent of the crimes laid to his charge,  thrown again into the hands of his enemies who have so long sought  for his life; in whose life and prosperity she only looks for the few  remaining comforts she can enjoy. I entreat of your excellency  to spare us these afflictions and many sufferings which cannot be  uttered; and secure to yourself the pleasure of doing good, and  vastly increasing human happiness; secure to yourself the benediction  of the aged and the gratitude of the young and the blessing and  veneration of the rising generation.
Respectfully your most obedient— .—
Sir I hope you will favor me with an answer
This letter was sent to by brother who presented it  to on Friday morning the 19th. Inst. in presence of . The read the letter with much attention apparently and when  he got through he passed high encomiums on and expressed  astonishment at the judgement and talent manifest in the manner  of her address, He presented the letter to requesting him to  read it. then proceeded to reiterate the same language as on  a former occasion viz. that he was satisfied there was no excitement any  where but in “amongst the Mormons themselves” all was quiet  and no apprehension of trouble in other places so far as he was able to  ascertain. He afterwards stated when conversing on another subject  that “persons were offering their services every day either in person  or by letter and held themselves in readiness to come against us  whenever he should call upon them, but he never had had the least  idea of calling out the Militia neither had he thought it necessary.  There was evidently a contradiction in his assertions in the above  instances and although he said “there was no excitement but amongst  them Mormons” it is evident he knew better. He also said that it was  his opinion that if president Joseph would give himself up to the Sheriff  he would be honorably acquited and the matter would be ended; but on   asking how hee thought the president could go through  the midst of his enemies without voilence being used towards him  and if acquited how he was to get back? the was evidently at a  loss what to say but made light of the matter as though he thought  it might be easily done. He took great care to state that it was not  his advice that Mr Smith should give himself up but thought it  would be soonest decided. It appeared evident that we have no great  things to expect from as it is evident he is no friend. He  acknowledged his ignorance of the law touching the case in plain terms. [p. 178]
and beg you to spare me, and my helpless children. I beg you to spare my innocent children the heartrending sorrow of again seeing their father unjustly drag’ed to prison or to death. I appeal to your affections as a son and beg you to spare our aged ,— the only surviving parent we have left,— the unsupportable affliction of seeing her son, who she knows to be innocent of the crimes laid to his charge, thrown again into the hands of his enemies who have so long sought for his life; in whose life and prosperity she only looks for the few remaining comforts she can enjoy. I entreat of your excellency to spare us these afflictions and many sufferings which cannot be uttered; and secure to yourself the pleasure of doing good, and vastly increasing human happiness; secure to yourself the benediction of the aged and the gratitude of the young and the blessing and veneration of the rising generation.
Respectfully your most obedient— .—
Sir I hope you will favor me with an answer
This letter was sent to by brother who presented it to on Friday morning the 19th. Inst. in presence of . The read the letter with much attention apparently and when he got through he passed high encomiums on and expressed astonishment at the judgement and talent manifest in the manner of her address, He presented the letter to requesting him to read it. then proceeded to reiterate the same language as on a former occasion viz. that he was satisfied there was no excitement any where but in “amongst the Mormons themselves” all was quiet and no apprehension of trouble in other places so far as he was able to ascertain. He afterwards stated when conversing on another subject that “persons were offering their services every day either in person or by letter and held themselves in readiness to come against us whenever he should call upon them, but he never had had the least idea of calling out the Militia neither had he thought it necessary. There was evidently a contradiction in his assertions in the above instances and although he said “there was no excitement but amongst the Mormons” it is evident he knew better. He also said that it was his opinion that if president Joseph would give himself up to the Sheriff he would be honorably acquited and the matter would be ended; but on asking how hee thought the president could go through the midst of his enemies without voilence being used towards him and if acquited how he was to get back? the was evidently at a loss what to say but made light of the matter as though he thought it might be easily done. He took great care to state that it was not his advice that Mr Smith should give himself up but thought it would be soonest decided. It appeared evident that we have no great things to expect from as it is evident he is no friend. He acknowledged his ignorance of the law touching the case in plain terms. [p. 178]
Page 178