Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 179
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23 August 1842 • Tuesday
Tuesday 23— This day president Joseph has renewed the subject of conversation, in relation  to his faithful brethren, and friends in his own words; which I now  proceed to record as follows;
“While I contemplate the virtues and the good  qualifications and characterestics of the faithful few, which I am now recording  in the Book of the Law of the Lord, of such as have stood by me in every  hour of peril, for these fifteen long years past; say for instance; my aged and  beloved brother , who was among the number of the first  to administer to my necessities, while I was laboring, in the commencement  of the bringing forth of the work of the Lord, and of laying the foundation  of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints: for fifteen years has he  been faithful and true, and even handed, and exemplary and virtuous, and  kind; never deviating to the right hand nor to the left. Behold he is a  righteous man. May God Almighty lengthen out the old mans days; and  may his trembling, tortured and broken body be renewed, and the vigor  of health turn upon him; if it can be thy will, consistently, O God;  and it shall be said of him by the sons of Zion, while there is one of  them remaining; that this man, was a faithful man in Israel;  therefore his name shall never be forgotten. There is his son   and whose names I record in the Book  of the Law of the Lord, with unspeakable delight, for they are my friends.  There are a numerous host of faithful souls, whose names I could wish  to record in the Book of the Law of the Lord; but time and chance  would fail. I will mention therefore only a few of them as emblem atical of those who are to numerous to be written. But there is  one man I would mention namely , who is now  a fellow-wanderer with myself— an exile from his home because  of the murderous deeds and infernal fiendish disposition of the  indefatigable and unrelenting hand of the Missourians. He is an  innocent and a noble boy; may God Almighty deliver him from  the hands of his pursuers. He was an innocent and a noble child,  and my soul loves him; Let this be recorded for ever and ever.  Let the blessings of Salvation and honor be his portion. But as I said  before, so say I again while I remember the faithful few who are  now living, I would remember also the faithful of my friends who  are dead, for they are many; and many are the acts of kindness, and  paternal, and brotherly kindnesses which they have bestowed upon me.  And since I have been hunted by the Missourians many are the  scenes which have been called to my mind. Many thoughts have  rolled through my head, and across my breast. I have remembered  the scenes of my child-hood I have thought of who is  dead; who died by disease which was brought upon him through  suffering by the hands of ruthless mobs. He was a great and a  good man. The envy of knaves and fools was heaped upon him,  and this was his lot and portion all the days of his life. He  was of noble stature, and possessed a high, and holy, and exalted,  and a virtuous mind. His soul soared above all those mean [p. 179]
23 August 1842 • Tuesday
Tuesday 23— This day president Joseph has renewed the subject of conversation, in relation to his faithful brethren, and friends in his own words; which I now proceed to record as follows;
“While I contemplate the virtues and the good qualifications and characterestics of the faithful few, which I am now recording in the Book of the Law of the Lord, of such as have stood by me in every hour of peril, for these fifteen long years past; say for instance; my aged and beloved brother , who was among the number of the first to administer to my necessities, while I was laboring, in the commencement of the bringing forth of the work of the Lord, and of laying the foundation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints: for fifteen years has he been faithful and true, and even handed, and exemplary and virtuous, and kind; never deviating to the right hand nor to the left. Behold he is a righteous man. May God Almighty lengthen out the old mans days; and may his trembling, tortured and broken body be renewed, and the vigor of health turn upon him; if it can be thy will, consistently, O God; and it shall be said of him by the sons of Zion, while there is one of them remaining; that this man, was a faithful man in Israel; therefore his name shall never be forgotten. There is his son and whose names I record in the Book of the Law of the Lord, with unspeakable delight, for they are my friends. There are a numerous host of faithful souls, whose names I could wish to record in the Book of the Law of the Lord; but time and chance would fail. I will mention therefore only a few of them as emblematical of those who are to numerous to be written. But there is one man I would mention namely , who is now a fellow-wanderer with myself— an exile from his home because of the murderous deeds and infernal fiendish disposition of the indefatigable and unrelenting hand of the Missourians. He is an innocent and a noble boy; may God Almighty deliver him from the hands of his pursuers. He was an innocent and a noble child, and my soul loves him; Let this be recorded for ever and ever. Let the blessings of Salvation and honor be his portion. But as I said before, so say I again while I remember the faithful few who are now living, I would remember also the faithful of my friends who are dead, for they are many; and many are the acts of kindness, and paternal, and brotherly kindnesses which they have bestowed upon me. And since I have been hunted by the Missourians many are the scenes which have been called to my mind. Many thoughts have rolled through my head, and across my breast. I have remembered the scenes of my child-hood I have thought of who is dead; who died by disease which was brought upon him through suffering by the hands of ruthless mobs. He was a great and a good man. The envy of knaves and fools was heaped upon him, and this was his lot and portion all the days of his life. He was of noble stature, and possessed a high, and holy, and exalted, and a virtuous mind. His soul soared above all those mean [p. 179]
Page 179