Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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doctrine I do most heartily subscribe to, and practice; the testimony of mean  men, to the contrary, notwithstanding. But Sir, I will assure you, that my  soul soars far above all the mean and grovelling dispositions of men that are  dispos’d to abuse me and my character; I therefore shall not dwell upon that  subject.
In relation to those men you speak of, referred to above; I will only say  that there are thousands of such men in this church; who, if a man is  found worthy to associate with, will call down the envy of a mean world,  because of their high and noble demeanor; and it is with unspeakable  delight that I contemplate them as my friends & brethren. I love them  with a perfect love; and I hope they love me, and have no reason to doubt  but they do.
The next in consideration is . I was his friend.  I am yet his friend; as I feel myself bound to be a friend to all the sons  of Adam; whether they are just or unjust, they have a degree of my  compassion & sympathy. If he is my enemy it is his own fault; and  the responsibility rests upon his own head; and instead of arraigning his  character before you, suffice it to say, that his own conduct wherever he goes,  will be sufficient to recommend him to an enlightened public, whether  for a bad man, or a good one. Therefore whosoever will associate themselves  with him, may be assured that I will not persecute them; but I do not  wish their association: And what I have said may suffice on that subject, so far  as his character is concern’d.
Now in relation to his book that he may write, I will venture a  prophecy; that whosoever has any hand in the matter, will find them selves in a poor fix, in relation to the money matters. And as to my  having any fears of the influence that he may have against me; or any  other man or set of men may have, is the most foreign from my heart;  for I never knew what it was, as yet, to fear the face of clay, or the influence  of man. My fear, Sir, is before God. I fear to offend him, and strive  to keep his commandments. I am really glad that you did not  join in relation to his book, from the assurances which I have,  that it will prove a curse to all those who touch it.
In relation to the honors that you speak of, both for yourself and   of the Herald, you are both strangers to me,  and as kept all his letters, which he receiv’d from  you, entirely to himself; and there was no correspondence between you  and me, that I knew of; I had no opportunity to share very  largely in in the getting up of any of those matters. I could not, as  I had not sufficient knowledge to enable me to do so. The whole,  therefore, was at the instigation of , and a quiet  submission on the part of the rest, out of the best of feelings.
But as for myself, it was all done at a time when I was overwh elm’d with a great many business cares, as well as the care of all  the churches. I must be excus’d therefore, for any wrongs that may  have taken place, in relation to this matter: And so far as I [p. 193]
doctrine I do most heartily subscribe to, and practice; the testimony of mean men, to the contrary, notwithstanding. But Sir, I will assure you, that my soul soars far above all the mean and grovelling dispositions of men that are dispos’d to abuse me and my character; I therefore shall not dwell upon that subject.
In relation to those men you speak of, referred to above; I will only say that there are thousands of such men in this church; who, if a man is found worthy to associate with, will call down the envy of a mean world, because of their high and noble demeanor; and it is with unspeakable delight that I contemplate them as my friends & brethren. I love them with a perfect love; and I hope they love me, and have no reason to doubt but they do.
The next in consideration is . I was his friend. I am yet his friend; as I feel myself bound to be a friend to all the sons of Adam; whether they are just or unjust, they have a degree of my compassion & sympathy. If he is my enemy it is his own fault; and the responsibility rests upon his own head; and instead of arraigning his character before you, suffice it to say, that his own conduct wherever he goes, will be sufficient to recommend him to an enlightened public, whether for a bad man, or a good one. Therefore whosoever will associate themselves with him, may be assured that I will not persecute them; but I do not wish their association: And what I have said may suffice on that subject, so far as his character is concern’d.
Now in relation to his book that he may write, I will venture a prophecy; that whosoever has any hand in the matter, will find themselves in a poor fix, in relation to the money matters. And as to my having any fears of the influence that he may have against me; or any other man or set of men may have, is the most foreign from my heart; for I never knew what it was, as yet, to fear the face of clay, or the influence of man. My fear, Sir, is before God. I fear to offend him, and strive to keep his commandments. I am really glad that you did not join in relation to his book, from the assurances which I have, that it will prove a curse to all those who touch it.
In relation to the honors that you speak of, both for yourself and of the Herald, you are both strangers to me, and as kept all his letters, which he receiv’d from you, entirely to himself; and there was no correspondence between you and me, that I knew of; I had no opportunity to share very largely in the getting up of any of those matters. I could not, as I had not sufficient knowledge to enable me to do so. The whole, therefore, was at the instigation of , and a quiet submission on the part of the rest, out of the best of feelings.
But as for myself, it was all done at a time when I was overwhelm’d with a great many business cares, as well as the care of all the churches. I must be excus’d therefore, for any wrongs that may have taken place, in relation to this matter: And so far as I [p. 193]
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