“Latter Day Saints,” 1844

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 408
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Many of our brethren removed to , where they con tinued until 1836 (three years); there was no violence offered, but  there were threatenings of violence. But in the summer of 1836  these threatenings began to assume a more serious aspect; from  threats, public meetings were called, resolutions were passed, ven geance and destruction were threatened, and affairs again assumed a  fearful attitude; was a sufficient precedent, and as  the authorities in that county did not interfere, they boasted that they  would not in this; which on application to the authorities we found  to be too true; and, after much violence, privation, and loss of pro perty, we were again driven from our homes.
We next settled in and counties, where we made  large and extensive settlements thinking to free ourselves from the  power of oppression by settling in new counties, with a very few in habitants in them; but here we were not allowed to live in peace;  and in 1838 were again attacked by mobs; an exterminating order  was issued by and under the sanction of law, an  organized banditti ravaged the country, robbing us of our cattle,  sheep, horses, hogs, &c.; many of our people were murdered in cold  blood, the chastity of our women was violated, and we were forced  to sign away our property at the point of the sword; and after en during every indignity that could be heaped upon us by an inhuman,  ungodly band of marauders,—from twelve to fifteen thousand souls,  men, women, and children, were driven from their own firesides, and  from lands for which they had warrantee deeds, to wander houseless,  friendless, and homeless, (in the depth of winter,) as exiles on the  earth, or to seek an asylum in a more genial clime, and among a less  barbarous people.
Many sickened and died in consequence of the cold and hardships  they had to endure, many wives were left widows, and children or phans and destitute.
It would take more time than I am able to devote to your service,  at present, to describe the injustice, the wrongs, the murders, the  bloodshed, thefts, misery and wo that have been committed upon  our people by the barbarous, inhuman, and lawless proceedings of  the State of . And I would refer you, and the readers of  your history who may be desirous of further information on this topic,  to the evidence taken on my recent trial before the Municipal Court  of , on Saturday, July 1st, 1843, on a writ of habeas corpus,  which is published in pamphlet form by Messrs. & ,  of this .
After being thus inhumanly expelled by the government and people  from , we found an asylum and friends in the State of [p. 408]
Many of our brethren removed to , where they continued until 1836 (three years); there was no violence offered, but there were threatenings of violence. But in the summer of 1836 these threatenings began to assume a more serious aspect; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions were passed, vengeance and destruction were threatened, and affairs again assumed a fearful attitude; was a sufficient precedent, and as the authorities in that county did not interfere, they boasted that they would not in this; which on application to the authorities we found to be too true; and, after much violence, privation, and loss of property, we were again driven from our homes.
We next settled in and counties, where we made large and extensive settlements thinking to free ourselves from the power of oppression by settling in new counties, with a very few inhabitants in them; but here we were not allowed to live in peace; and in 1838 were again attacked by mobs; an exterminating order was issued by and under the sanction of law, an organized banditti ravaged the country, robbing us of our cattle, sheep, horses, hogs, &c.; many of our people were murdered in cold blood, the chastity of our women was violated, and we were forced to sign away our property at the point of the sword; and after enduring every indignity that could be heaped upon us by an inhuman, ungodly band of marauders,—from twelve to fifteen thousand souls, men, women, and children, were driven from their own firesides, and from lands for which they had warrantee deeds, to wander houseless, friendless, and homeless, (in the depth of winter,) as exiles on the earth, or to seek an asylum in a more genial clime, and among a less barbarous people.
Many sickened and died in consequence of the cold and hardships they had to endure, many wives were left widows, and children orphans and destitute.
It would take more time than I am able to devote to your service, at present, to describe the injustice, the wrongs, the murders, the bloodshed, thefts, misery and wo that have been committed upon our people by the barbarous, inhuman, and lawless proceedings of the State of . And I would refer you, and the readers of your history who may be desirous of further information on this topic, to the evidence taken on my recent trial before the Municipal Court of , on Saturday, July 1st, 1843, on a writ of habeas corpus, which is published in pamphlet form by Messrs. & , of this .
After being thus inhumanly expelled by the government and people from , we found an asylum and friends in the State of [p. 408]
Page 408