Letter from Heber C. Kimball, 9 July 1840

  • Source Note
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his kingdom. Next day took us, and carried us to ’s: while on the road the chills came upon me again, and I suffered much pain and fatigue. When we got there we found sick in bed, and the other brethren not much better. Next day took us on our journey about twenty-five miles; to the place where resided, at the town of Pitsfield. The other brethren left us at Brother Wilber’s and took another road.
Next day Brother [James] Allred carried us about four miles to another town where your Uncle resided, we arrived a few days after his death. Next day Brother Rogers carried us to Morgan county, town of Winchester. to the house of Roswell Murray my father-in-law, where we found two of ’s brothers and one sister; and other brethren of the church who had been scattered into that part from . These brethren had been stripped of their property and smitten &c. yet we found them in comfortable circumstances, rejoicing in God.
From thence Brother carried us to the town of , distance twelve miles; my father-in-law went with us on a visit to his friends in the east. The next day the brethren at carried us to a distance of about forty miles:—this was on the 5th of October. Here we again met with Brothers , , and ; at this place was taken sick, we remained here until the 11th, then the brethren there gave us a horse and fitted up a wagon, and putting both horses to the wagon we all started together: they also gave us some money to assist us on our journey.— We continued on our journey five or six days until we arrived at on the banks of Wabash river on the 17th, during this time our axle tree broke twice, and we had to suffer hunger in consequence of having to cross large prairies, and the food we got was altogether johnny-cake, and corn dodger, and poor bacon. I was very sick during most part of this journey; sometimes I thought I scarcely could live. We put up at Doctor Modiset’s. I was here taken out of the wagon and laid upon the bed; the doctor, his wife, and were obliged to watch almost all the night in order to keep a breath of life in me. Next morning the brethren came to us: my feelings were for them to go on their journey and leave me and with me. I requested them to lay their hands on me and pray for me, which they did previous to their departure. I was then not able to sit up: they left us in tears, some of them not expecting to behold my face again. In about an hour after the brethren departed I arose from my bed; and in a few days we started on our journey. The doctor took us in his carriage and carried us twenty miles. Then we were taken by Doctor [Lenox] Knight to Pleasant Garden about four miles further.
After tarrying there a few days carried us ten miles to a brother’s house.— Next day the brother took us on our journey fifteen miles to the town Bellville. A storm arose which obliged us to put up here. was taken very sick and was obliged to go to bed: we tarried until the next morning. The landlord and landlady were very kind to us and received our testimony: and I think I never saw better feelings towards us as a people than was manifested in this place, being southern people, and may the Lord bless them and gather out his elect. The next day we took coach leaving some of the people in tears. We continued on our journey mostly night and day until we arrived at on November 3rd, where we again overtook Brothers , , and Hadlock and my father-in-law. This reminded me of a prediction which I delivered on the morning they left us, viz. that we would get to before they would: same day we proceeded to .
The brethren had taken up on the road where he had been confined by sickness. When we got to being overcome by the fatigues of our journey, we were most of us taken sick again with the chill fever, some of us were confined to our beds.— We remained there until the 22nd: some one of us preached in the every Sabbath during our stay there. We found the saints in a rather dis-organized state and disagreed, dwelling upon things that were past and finding fault, We found some few that were very kind to us and administered to us in our sickness, others felt disposed to cast reflections upon us, saying that our sickness came upon us in consequence of our unrighteousness; and when the brethren were suffering keenly from the effects of fatigue and sickness: these things were heaped upon them in an unfeeling manner, and when we were preparing to start on our journey, they would not administer to our wants nor help us on our journey, saying that they did not believe we were sent of God, and casting many other reflections upon us (that is many of them,) if it were necessary I could mention names. May the Lord bless and preserve those who did minister to our necessities, for the time will come when they shall be rewarded for their deeds of kindness. On the 22nd, we left for . We did not sail from this place until the 26th on ac [p. 860]
his kingdom. Next day took us, and carried us to ’s: while on the road the chills came upon me again, and I suffered much pain and fatigue. When we got there we found sick in bed, and the other brethren not much better. Next day took us on our journey about twenty-five miles; to the place where resided, at the town of Pitsfield. The other brethren left us at Brother Wilber’s and took another road.
Next day Brother [James] Allred carried us about four miles to another town where your Uncle resided, we arrived a few days after his death. Next day Brother Rogers carried us to Morgan county, town of Winchester. to the house of Roswell Murray my father-in-law, where we found two of ’s brothers and one sister; and other brethren of the church who had been scattered into that part from . These brethren had been stripped of their property and smitten &c. yet we found them in comfortable circumstances, rejoicing in God.
From thence Brother carried us to the town of , distance twelve miles; my father-in-law went with us on a visit to his friends in the east. The next day the brethren at carried us to a distance of about forty miles:—this was on the 5th of October. Here we again met with Brothers , , and ; at this place was taken sick, we remained here until the 11th, then the brethren there gave us a horse and fitted up a wagon, and putting both horses to the wagon we all started together: they also gave us some money to assist us on our journey.— We continued on our journey five or six days until we arrived at on the banks of Wabash river on the 17th, during this time our axle tree broke twice, and we had to suffer hunger in consequence of having to cross large prairies, and the food we got was altogether johnny-cake, and corn dodger, and poor bacon. I was very sick during most part of this journey; sometimes I thought I scarcely could live. We put up at Doctor Modiset’s. I was here taken out of the wagon and laid upon the bed; the doctor, his wife, and were obliged to watch almost all the night in order to keep a breath of life in me. Next morning the brethren came to us: my feelings were for them to go on their journey and leave me and with me. I requested them to lay their hands on me and pray for me, which they did previous to their departure. I was then not able to sit up: they left us in tears, some of them not expecting to behold my face again. In about an hour after the brethren departed I arose from my bed; and in a few days we started on our journey. The doctor took us in his carriage and carried us twenty miles. Then we were taken by Doctor Lenox Knight to Pleasant Garden about four miles further.
After tarrying there a few days carried us ten miles to a brother’s house.— Next day the brother took us on our journey fifteen miles to the town Bellville. A storm arose which obliged us to put up here. was taken very sick and was obliged to go to bed: we tarried until the next morning. The landlord and landlady were very kind to us and received our testimony: and I think I never saw better feelings towards us as a people than was manifested in this place, being southern people, and may the Lord bless them and gather out his elect. The next day we took coach leaving some of the people in tears. We continued on our journey mostly night and day until we arrived at on November 3rd, where we again overtook Brothers , , and Hadlock and my father-in-law. This reminded me of a prediction which I delivered on the morning they left us, viz. that we would get to before they would: same day we proceeded to .
The brethren had taken up on the road where he had been confined by sickness. When we got to being overcome by the fatigues of our journey, we were most of us taken sick again with the chill fever, some of us were confined to our beds.— We remained there until the 22nd: some one of us preached in the every Sabbath during our stay there. We found the saints in a rather dis-organized state and disagreed, dwelling upon things that were past and finding fault, We found some few that were very kind to us and administered to us in our sickness, others felt disposed to cast reflections upon us, saying that our sickness came upon us in consequence of our unrighteousness; and when the brethren were suffering keenly from the effects of fatigue and sickness: these things were heaped upon them in an unfeeling manner, and when we were preparing to start on our journey, they would not administer to our wants nor help us on our journey, saying that they did not believe we were sent of God, and casting many other reflections upon us (that is many of them,) if it were necessary I could mention names. May the Lord bless and preserve those who did minister to our necessities, for the time will come when they shall be rewarded for their deeds of kindness. On the 22nd, we left for . We did not sail from this place until the 26th on ac [p. 860]
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