Letter from Heber C. Kimball, 9 July 1840

  • Source Note
Page 863
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bles laid before the house of Commons, that the average price of labor in Ireland, for thirty or forty weeks in the year, is eight pence per day, for an able-bodied man; for the remainder of the season, principally during the summer months, one-fourth of the entire population are blank idle.
[“]Now, observe, a stone (fourteen pounds) of potatoes will hardly give a man, his wife, and four or five children (many of them have ten children) one meal in the day. A stone of potatoes is eight pence to one shilling at present; where then are this vast population to be fed from? Nothing short of the miraculous interference of heaven can save them. Hunger has driven them already to attack the flour and provision stores in Limerick, Ennis, Galway, Menreagh, Killaloe, and at several other places along the banks of the Shannon. Upon one occasion they attacked a boat taking in oats intended for the English market; this they instantly seized, and distributed its contents, six hundred sacks, in small parcels amongst the vast multitude. In every case there was no appearance of drunkenness, but there was every appearance of hunger. Yet while all this is going on, we perceive your bishops and princes, your lords and ladies squandering away thousands upon thousands in idle luxury in , that enormous den. Dare we contemplate the end?”—Dublin correspondent of the Manchester Advertiser.
These things are coming upon the inhabitants, yet they are blind and cannot see it: they appear to exult over the saints, and when a few fine days come (which are indeed scarce) they cry out to the saints, “where is your famines, pestilences, and judgments you have predicted;” we tell them to wait a little while and they shall see them, and then they shall know that we have told the truth. And now after all these things which I have seen, together with the toils, fatigues, labors, pains, and sufferings, which I have endured; I have never had one discouraging moment, nor felt the least dismayed; but with an unshaken confidence I have pressed my way forward, and am still determined to pursue the same path, looking forward to the recompense of reward; and these are the feelings of my brethren as far as I have knowledge; they are in good spirits and we have had a season of rejoicing together for the past few days. Since we came into this land there has been six conferences of the church in different parts to do the business of the church; and there has not been hitherto in all our proceedings, the least discordant voice, and we feel as though God was with us indeed, and does bless us and our labors.
A short time ago I went in company with to Burnley, a large town, to visit a church. Having a desire to go down into a coal-pit; I went to the master and told him that I was from and had a desire to go down into the pit. He consented and fitted us out in colliers clothes, and then let us down the shaft to the depth of one hundred and seventy-four yards or five hundred and twenty-two feet. We then took a course and went from the shaft something more than nine hundred yards, and in this place there was about one hundred men and boys laboring, and six horses which drawed the coal from different parts of the mine to the shaft. Burnley is the place where the Danes assembled, when they conquered ; and took the men captive, and took their women to wife. These women entered into a secret combination with each other and appointing a night they slew the Danes and liberated their own husbands.
I must now close my correspondence for the present, and I desire that you would give my love to President , and to your and , and to all your friends; to Bishops , , and ; and to the high council; and to all the elders and saints in Zion; and especially to yourself and family. The brethren all send their love to you and the saints. Please to remember me to my dear and children. wishes to be remembered to you and all the saints. This from your friend and well wisher in the new and everlasting covenant.
To Mr. Joseph Smith, Jr. [p. 863]
bles laid before the house of Commons, that the average price of labor in Ireland, for thirty or forty weeks in the year, is eight pence per day, for an able-bodied man; for the remainder of the season, principally during the summer months, one-fourth of the entire population are blank idle.
[“]Now, observe, a stone (fourteen pounds) of potatoes will hardly give a man, his wife, and four or five children (many of them have ten children) one meal in the day. A stone of potatoes is eight pence to one shilling at present; where then are this vast population to be fed from? Nothing short of the miraculous interference of heaven can save them. Hunger has driven them already to attack the flour and provision stores in Limerick, Ennis, Galway, Menreagh, Killaloe, and at several other places along the banks of the Shannon. Upon one occasion they attacked a boat taking in oats intended for the English market; this they instantly seized, and distributed its contents, six hundred sacks, in small parcels amongst the vast multitude. In every case there was no appearance of drunkenness, but there was every appearance of hunger. Yet while all this is going on, we perceive your bishops and princes, your lords and ladies squandering away thousands upon thousands in idle luxury in , that enormous den. Dare we contemplate the end?”—Dublin correspondent of the Manchester Advertiser.
These things are coming upon the inhabitants, yet they are blind and cannot see it: they appear to exult over the saints, and when a few fine days come (which are indeed scarce) they cry out to the saints, “where is your famines, pestilences, and judgments you have predicted;” we tell them to wait a little while and they shall see them, and then they shall know that we have told the truth. And now after all these things which I have seen, together with the toils, fatigues, labors, pains, and sufferings, which I have endured; I have never had one discouraging moment, nor felt the least dismayed; but with an unshaken confidence I have pressed my way forward, and am still determined to pursue the same path, looking forward to the recompense of reward; and these are the feelings of my brethren as far as I have knowledge; they are in good spirits and we have had a season of rejoicing together for the past few days. Since we came into this land there has been six conferences of the church in different parts to do the business of the church; and there has not been hitherto in all our proceedings, the least discordant voice, and we feel as though God was with us indeed, and does bless us and our labors.
A short time ago I went in company with to Burnley, a large town, to visit a church. Having a desire to go down into a coal-pit; I went to the master and told him that I was from and had a desire to go down into the pit. He consented and fitted us out in colliers clothes, and then let us down the shaft to the depth of one hundred and seventy-four yards or five hundred and twenty-two feet. We then took a course and went from the shaft something more than nine hundred yards, and in this place there was about one hundred men and boys laboring, and six horses which drawed the coal from different parts of the mine to the shaft. Burnley is the place where the Danes assembled, when they conquered ; and took the men captive, and took their women to wife. These women entered into a secret combination with each other and appointing a night they slew the Danes and liberated their own husbands.
I must now close my correspondence for the present, and I desire that you would give my love to President , and to your and , and to all your friends; to Bishops , , and ; and to the high council; and to all the elders and saints in Zion; and especially to yourself and family. The brethren all send their love to you and the saints. Please to remember me to my dear and children. wishes to be remembered to you and all the saints. This from your friend and well wisher in the new and everlasting covenant.
To Mr. Joseph Smith, Jr. [p. 863]
Page 863