Letter from Isaac Galland, 11 March 1843

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for this service in what ever way he may desire the it to be done. Now Sir I have this <day,> seen Mr Blannerhassett, and conversed with him on the subject. He informs me that he has wrote to on on the case. and But I will here take occasion to say, what, Mr. Blannerhassett would not say, and that is, that could not have selected from the bar of this , or perhaps of the ; a councillor better, or even as well quallified to defend him as Mr Blannerhassett, can and will do; provided that mobocracy does not supersede the administration of law. I know nothing of the guilt or innocence of this individual, nor have I heard any circumstance connected with the charge of guilt against him; except what what has been alledged by Genl. in his affidavits and lectures, and these are taken in this with great allowances. I do hope that that may have a fair & lawful course taken in relation to his trial, but it is scarcely to be expected. Therefore However it is the duty of his friends, to, at least make an effort to secure him a fair trial. And I will here rema[r]k that Mr. Melloday informed me that he met the appraoaching storm with perfect composure. said that he had rather die, than be deprived of his liberty— and so long as this charge rested on him, uninvestigated, he must be restrained from going where he pleased— he asserted his innocence; but declared, he had rather die, than live under the disabilities which such a charge inflicted. He left here perfectly reconciled to his fate, be that what it may. [p. [2]]
for this service in what ever way he may desire it to be done. Now Sir I have this day, seen Mr Blannerhassett, and conversed with him on the subject. He informs me that he has wrote to on the case. But I will here take occasion to say, what, Mr. Blannerhassett would not say, and that is, that could not have selected from the bar of this , or perhaps of the ; a councillor better, or even as well quallified to defend him as Mr Blannerhassett, can and will do; provided that mobocracy does not supersede the administration of law. I know nothing of the guilt or innocence of this individual, nor have I heard any circumstance connected with the charge of guilt against him; except what has been alledged by Genl. in his affidavits and lectures, and these are taken in this with great allowances. I do hope that may have a fair & lawful course taken in relation to his trial, but it is scarcely to be expected. However it is the duty of his friends, to, at least make an effort to secure him a fair trial. And I will here remark that Mr. Melloday informed me that he met the appraoaching storm with perfect composure. said that he had rather die, than be deprived of his liberty— and so long as this charge rested on him, uninvestigated, he must be restrained from going where he pleased— he asserted his innocence; but declared, he had rather die, than live under the disabilities which such a charge inflicted. He left here perfectly reconciled to his fate, be that what it may. [p. [2]]
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