Letter from John Corrill, 17 November 1833

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  • Historical Introduction
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November 17, 1833.
Dear brethren—I will give you a few particulars of our proceedings, and also of the rioters, as I have been able to collect them. Some forty or fifty of them in one night, demolished or unroofed ten houses of ours, above . They came out again in the night and two of their number were taken, and that stopped their career that night. Again they fell upon the society at the Blue, and commenced firing upon them, which was returned by the society, and one of their men was shot through the thigh. Again they came out against the society above the , a battle ensued in which some two or three of their men were killed, and a number wounded and shortly died, and others were wounded but are like to recover.
was shot through the bowels and his case is considered doubtful; another by the name of [Andrew] Barber was wounded and has since died; five or six more were wounded but not mortally. Another party had fallen upon the brethren in and did considerable damage. We went against them, and took one man while in the act of breaking open the . We had him before the magistrate but he refused to do any thing with him at that time. He then sued myself, and others for an assault; we were prisoners in the court house for trial when the news came of the battle above . The house being full they rushed upon us to kill us, but through the mercy of God we were preserved and not hurt: we saw plainly that the whole county were enraged, and preparing for a general massacre the next day. We then thought it wisdom to stop the shedding of more blood; and by agreeing to leave immediately we saved many lives; in this we feel justified. But we are literally in a scattered, miserable condition, not knowing what we shall be called to pass through next. The brethren, generally bare it patiently and feel cheerful, trusting in God, and but few deny the faith—I will write more particulars hereafter, Yours, &c. [p. 120]
November 17, 1833.
Dear brethren—I will give you a few particulars of our proceedings, and also of the rioters, as I have been able to collect them. Some forty or fifty of them in one night, demolished or unroofed ten houses of ours, above . They came out again in the night and two of their number were taken, and that stopped their career that night. Again they fell upon the society at the Blue, and commenced firing upon them, which was returned by the society, and one of their men was shot through the thigh. Again they came out against the society above the , a battle ensued in which some two or three of their men were killed, and a number wounded and shortly died, and others were wounded but are like to recover.
was shot through the bowels and his case is considered doubtful; another by the name of Andrew Barber was wounded and has since died; five or six more were wounded but not mortally. Another party had fallen upon the brethren in and did considerable damage. We went against them, and took one man while in the act of breaking open the . We had him before the magistrate but he refused to do any thing with him at that time. He then sued myself, and others for an assault; we were prisoners in the court house for trial when the news came of the battle above . The house being full they rushed upon us to kill us, but through the mercy of God we were preserved and not hurt: we saw plainly that the whole county were enraged, and preparing for a general massacre the next day. We then thought it wisdom to stop the shedding of more blood; and by agreeing to leave immediately we saved many lives; in this we feel justified. But we are literally in a scattered, miserable condition, not knowing what we shall be called to pass through next. The brethren, generally bare it patiently and feel cheerful, trusting in God, and but few deny the faith—I will write more particulars hereafter, Yours, &c. [p. 120]
Page 120