Letter from John Taylor, 3 February 1841

  • Source Note
Page 401
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that I may be kept humble, and that I may be able to realize continually the importance of my calling and finish my work with joy.
I have no doubt but that the rest of my brethren in the Quorum have all written to you, and no doubt will have put you in possession of all general information in relation to the work here; you have also received intelligence of our movements through the medium of the “Star” it would therefore be superfluous in me to enter into, those things generally. I am happy to state, however, that we have been united in our councils to the present time; that there has been no discordant feeling, nor jarring string; we were very happy to receive a communication from you, and to hear that things were prospering so well in , and wi the church generally; we were pleased to have your approbation and council which at all times is very acceptable. We have also received your letter in the “Times and Seasons” which also gave us satisfaction: and we feel thankful to our Heavenly Father that in all things we have gone right both in regard to our publishing the Hymn Book, the Book of Mormon and to our purp oses in regard to coming home, and in regard to our labors. We find that in all things our proceedings have precisely accorded with your council.
As it regards the work in general it is prospering here on all hands, in Preston, where it first commenced; they are continually adding to the church in Manchester, Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, and in Lancashire. In London, the work is beginning to break out, and in Edinburg, and Glasgow it is prospering. In the Isle of Man, and in Wales, it is rolling forth and to use a Sectarian expression “there has been a going among the mulberry trees” “a shaking among the dry bones.”
Perhaps it may not be altogether uninteresting for me to give a brief history of my proceedings since I left in company with , it would be superfluous for me to state the route we took to . Our mode of traveling, my sickness on the road, and our visit to &c. Suffice it to say, , and I landed in January 1840 and immediately proceeded to Preston, to council with the Persident of the church in England and his council, as to our best mode of proceeding until the rest of our Quorum came, when it was agreed upon that I should go to , and go to Staffordshire and then go to Birmingham if they thought proper; we took the parting hand the day following and each one took his respective course. accompanied me to where we immediately commenced our labors: the first Sabbath we visited several places of worship I asked liberty to make a few remarks in one and had an opportunity of speaking in their vestry to 18, or 20, preachers, and leaders while I was delivering my testimony some wept and others shouted Glory be to God, but when on being asked; I informed them what society we belonged to, they were afraid of us, having heard so many reports. One of their preachers, however, invited us home in the evening, and we appointed a meeting at his house in the week—members attended, to whom we conversed. We then took a room that would hold 4 or 500 people and in the meantime visited all that we could get access to. We called upon many of the leading ministers of different denominations, and delivered our testimony to them, some received us kindly, some otherwise but none would let us have their Chapels to hold forth in, they were so good in general, and so pure, that they had no room for the gospel, they were too holy to be righteous, too good to be pure, and had too much religion to enter into the kingdom of heaven.
Our being in town soon got rumored about and I suppose about 300 attended our first meeting, in preaching the power of God rested upon the people, and on my asking them if it was not good news they responded “yes”—while many wept under the influence of the spirit; and after preaching, ten persons came forward to be baptized, some of which felt convinced as soon as they saw us that we were men of God, and others had dreamed about us. Thus we see that the power was of God and not of man and to Him be the Glory. Things have continued to progress in this place from that time to the present we have now about 160 in society: 3 Elders, 5 Priests, 2 Teachers, and 2 Deacons.— We have taken the largest Hall in , and in the most eligible situation for twelve months, and things seem more likely for progressing than ever they have done from the commencement.
I visited Ireland some time ago and planted the standard of truth in that nation I stayed there something over a week, preached in several places, and baptized 2 before I left. Elder Curtis is now there and there is between 20 and 30 baptized. I did purpose making a stand in Belfast, but as I had other engagements in Scotland and , I knew that I would not commence without giving our adversaries an advantage which I knew that they would make a dishonorable use of; so I thought it best not to commence, as I had not time to stay. From thence I went to the City of Glasgow in Scotland where I met with , who had raised up a small church, to whom I preached. On my way to Glasgow a gentleman on the same boat informed me that had written a letter to his friends concerning the persecution and that as he was acquainted with him he, had published it in a periodical of that City (Belfast) I preached several times also in a place called Paisely in Scotland, where Elders [Samuel] Mulliner and [Alexander] Wright had raised up a church and obtained considerable influence, from thence I returned to , soon after I started to the Isle of Man, where I hired a large room capable of containing 1000 persons and commenced delivering lectures: great excitement prevailed and a persecuting spirit soon manifested itself. I held a discussion with one man, a preacher which had a tendency to enlighten the eyes of the public. Another wrote in the papers, and I answered him, another published pamphlets, and I answered them; another delivered lectures and I answer [p. 401]
that I may be kept humble, and that I may be able to realize continually the importance of my calling and finish my work with joy.
I have no doubt but that the rest of my brethren in the Quorum have all written to you, and no doubt will have put you in possession of all general information in relation to the work here; you have also received intelligence of our movements through the medium of the “Star” it would therefore be superfluous in me to enter into, those things generally. I am happy to state, however, that we have been united in our councils to the present time; that there has been no discordant feeling, nor jarring string; we were very happy to receive a communication from you, and to hear that things were prospering so well in , and wi the church generally; we were pleased to have your approbation and council which at all times is very acceptable. We have also received your letter in the “Times and Seasons” which also gave us satisfaction: and we feel thankful to our Heavenly Father that in all things we have gone right both in regard to our publishing the Hymn Book, the Book of Mormon and to our purp oses in regard to coming home, and in regard to our labors. We find that in all things our proceedings have precisely accorded with your council.
As it regards the work in general it is prospering here on all hands, in Preston, where it first commenced; they are continually adding to the church in Manchester, Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, and in Lancashire. In London, the work is beginning to break out, and in Edinburg, and Glasgow it is prospering. In the Isle of Man, and in Wales, it is rolling forth and to use a Sectarian expression “there has been a going among the mulberry trees” “a shaking among the dry bones.”
Perhaps it may not be altogether uninteresting for me to give a brief history of my proceedings since I left in company with , it would be superfluous for me to state the route we took to . Our mode of traveling, my sickness on the road, and our visit to &c. Suffice it to say, , and I landed in January 1840 and immediately proceeded to Preston, to council with the Persident of the church in England and his council, as to our best mode of proceeding until the rest of our Quorum came, when it was agreed upon that I should go to , and go to Staffordshire and then go to Birmingham if they thought proper; we took the parting hand the day following and each one took his respective course. accompanied me to where we immediately commenced our labors: the first Sabbath we visited several places of worship I asked liberty to make a few remarks in one and had an opportunity of speaking in their vestry to 18, or 20, preachers, and leaders while I was delivering my testimony some wept and others shouted Glory be to God, but when on being asked; I informed them what society we belonged to, they were afraid of us, having heard so many reports. One of their preachers, however, invited us home in the evening, and we appointed a meeting at his house in the week—members attended, to whom we conversed. We then took a room that would hold 4 or 500 people and in the meantime visited all that we could get access to. We called upon many of the leading ministers of different denominations, and delivered our testimony to them, some received us kindly, some otherwise but none would let us have their Chapels to hold forth in, they were so good in general, and so pure, that they had no room for the gospel, they were too holy to be righteous, too good to be pure, and had too much religion to enter into the kingdom of heaven.
Our being in town soon got rumored about and I suppose about 300 attended our first meeting, in preaching the power of God rested upon the people, and on my asking them if it was not good news they responded “yes”—while many wept under the influence of the spirit; and after preaching, ten persons came forward to be baptized, some of which felt convinced as soon as they saw us that we were men of God, and others had dreamed about us. Thus we see that the power was of God and not of man and to Him be the Glory. Things have continued to progress in this place from that time to the present we have now about 160 in society: 3 Elders, 5 Priests, 2 Teachers, and 2 Deacons.— We have taken the largest Hall in , and in the most eligible situation for twelve months, and things seem more likely for progressing than ever they have done from the commencement.
I visited Ireland some time ago and planted the standard of truth in that nation I stayed there something over a week, preached in several places, and baptized 2 before I left. Elder Curtis is now there and there is between 20 and 30 baptized. I did purpose making a stand in Belfast, but as I had other engagements in Scotland and , I knew that I would not commence without giving our adversaries an advantage which I knew that they would make a dishonorable use of; so I thought it best not to commence, as I had not time to stay. From thence I went to the City of Glasgow in Scotland where I met with , who had raised up a small church, to whom I preached. On my way to Glasgow a gentleman on the same boat informed me that had written a letter to his friends concerning the persecution and that as he was acquainted with him he, had published it in a periodical of that City (Belfast) I preached several times also in a place called Paisely in Scotland, where Elders [Samuel] Mulliner and Alexander Wright had raised up a church and obtained considerable influence, from thence I returned to , soon after I started to the Isle of Man, where I hired a large room capable of containing 1000 persons and commenced delivering lectures: great excitement prevailed and a persecuting spirit soon manifested itself. I held a discussion with one man, a preacher which had a tendency to enlighten the eyes of the public. Another wrote in the papers, and I answered him, another published pamphlets, and I answered them; another delivered lectures and I answer [p. 401]
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