Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [8], bk. 11
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gious instruction When we were fairly settled it commenced raining, and then a few of the sisters and those persons who did not belong to the church com began to murmur saying I wish we had hired a house for here we are in the rain and cold (for we were under the necessity of taking a deck passage) and we shall take cold and our children will be sick for likely as not we will have to be here these 2 weeks. I told them that I did not believe it would be an easy matter to get a house for the other brethren had informed me that it was almost impossible for them to get any accomodations at all, but if they were so uncomfortable they could not content themselves I would get a Brother to to try to get a room for them— He did so and after a tiresome search he returned and informed them that there was no vacant house to be found in the whole place, and then they grumbled again— At last they declared that they would not stay a room they would have let the case go as it would. Well Well said I will go myself and see what I can do for you and a room you shall have if there is a possibility of getting one on any terms whatever— The rain was still falling in torrents But went with me and held an umbrella over my head I went to the <nearest> tavern and asked the Landlord if he could let me have a room for some women to bring their beds into and sleep that their children were unwell and she thier they were so much exposed that I was fearful for their health. Yes said he I can easily make room for their them. at this a woman who was ironing in the room turned upon him very sharply saying I have put up here myself and I am not going to be encumbered with anybody’s things in my way Ill warrant the children have got the whooping cough or measels or some other ketchin disease and and if they come I[’]ll go some where else to board— [p. [8], bk. 11]
gious instruction When we were fairly settled it commenced raining, and then a few of the sisters and those persons who did not belong to the church began to murmur saying I wish we had hired a house for here we are in the rain and cold (for we were under the necessity of taking a deck passage) and we shall take cold and our children will be sick for likely as not we will have to be here these 2 weeks. I told them that I did not believe it would be an easy matter to get a house for the other brethren had informed me that it was almost impossible for them to get any accomodations at all, but if they they could not content themselves I would get Brother to try to get a room for them— He did so and after a tiresome search he returned and informed them that there was no vacant house to be found in the whole place, and then they grumbled again— At last they declared that they would not stay a room they would have let the case go as it would. Well Well said I will go myself and see what I can do for you and a room you shall have if there is a possibility of getting one on any terms whatever— The rain was still falling in torrents But went with me and held an umbrella over my head I went to the nearest tavern and asked the Landlord if he could let me have a room for some women to bring their beds into and sleep that their children were unwell and they were so much exposed that I was fearful for their health. Yes said he I can easily make room for them. at this a woman who was ironing in the room turned upon him very sharply saying I have put up here myself and I am not going to be encumbered with anybody’s things in my way Ill warrant the children have got the whooping cough or measels or some other ketchin disease and if they come I’ll go some where else to board— [p. [8], bk. 11]
Page [8], bk. 11