Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [4], bk. 15
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agian after so many perilous adventures alive and in health almost as soon as we set were well on our way the My sons began to have calls to preach and they soon found that if they would yield to the solicitation our journey would have been a preaching mission of very great length— And they were obliged to notify the people where we stopped that they could not pr[e]ach to them at all as we had not means suficient to take us through in case of so much detainure as must necessarily occur if they stopped to preach they however sowed the seeds of the gospel in many places and and were the means in the hands of God of doing Much good— We travelled on through many trials and difficulties Sometimes we lay in our tents through a driving storm at others we traveled on foot in thrugh Marshes and quagmires on foot so exposing our<selves> health by getting our feet <clothes> <to> wet and cold one night before we arrived at the we lay all night beneath <in> the rain which descended in torrents and I being more exposed than the other females suffered much with the cold and upon getting up in the morning I found that a quilted skirt which I had worn the day before was wringing wet but I coud not mend the matter by changing that for another for the rain was still falling and I wore it in this situation for 3 days in consequence of this I took a severe cold and was very sick so that when we arrived at the our I was unable to sit up any length and could not walk without assistance soon after we crossed this we stopped at a Negro hut a most unlovely place but we could go no farther here my grand daugter gave birth to a fine Girl which She called [blank]
the next morning we set out to find a more comfortabe situation for her and succeeded in getting a place about 4 miles distant and my poor was carried from the loathsome hut to this house in a double waggon the same day it was then agreed that My oldest [p. [4], bk. 15]
agian after so many perilous adventures alive and in health almost as soon as we were well on our way My sons began to have calls to preach and they soon found that if they would yield to the solicitation our journey would have been a preaching mission of very great length— And they were obliged to notify the people where we stopped that they could not preach to them at all as we had not means suficient to take us through in case of so much detainure as must necessarily occur if they stopped to preach they however sowed the seeds of the gospel in many places and were the means in the hands of God of doing Much good— We travelled on through many trials and difficulties Sometimes we lay in our tents through a driving storm at others we traveled thrugh Marshes and quagmires on foot exposing ourselves clothes to wet and cold one night before we arrived at the we lay all night in the rain which descended in torrents and I being more exposed than the other females suffered much with the cold and upon getting up in the morning I found that a quilted skirt which I had worn the day before was wringing wet but I coud not mend the matter by changing that for another for the rain was still falling and I wore it in this situation for 3 days in consequence of this I took a severe cold and was very sick so that when we arrived at the I was unable to sit up any length and could not walk without assistance after we crossed this we stopped at a Negro hut a most unlovely place but we could go no farther here my daugter gave birth to a fine Girl which She called [blank]
the next morning we set out to find a more comfortabe situation for her and succeeded in getting a place about 4 miles distant and my poor was carried from the loathsome hut to this house in a double waggon the same day it was then agreed that My oldest [p. [4], bk. 15]
Page [4], bk. 15