Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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daughter and her husband shou [blank] should stay with and that and the remainder of the party would go  try make what speed they could to wi th me for I was no longer able to ride in a sitting  posture but laid on a bedstead with my [face?] carefully  covered as the fresh air kept me coughing continu ally I My did not much expect me to liv e to there end of the journey <for in going to I could not travel sometimes more than 4 miles a day—> but as soon as we arrived  at <there> he sought a place where we might stop  sometime and all that nursing would do for me  might be done— It was my own request going [a]s far  as but they did not know why I ur ged the matter the fact was I had an impression  that if I could get there and by some means be  able to by the assistance of walking sticks to find a  place where I would be secluded and uninterrupted  in calling upon the Lord that I might be healed  and accordingly I siezed upon a time when they were  engaged and by the aid of staffs I reached A fence  and then followed the fence some distance till I came  to a dense hazel thicket here I threw myself on the  ground and thought it was no matter how far I was  from the house for if the Lord would not hear  me and I must die I might as well die here as  any where when I was a little rested I began to  call upon God to beseech his mercy praying for  my health and that the life of my daughter : I urged every claim which the scriptures had  gives us and made was as humble as I knew how to be  and I continued praying near 3 hours. I at last receiv ed was entirely releived from pain and my cough left me  and I was well moreover I received an assurance that  I should hear from my <sick> about the middle of the  same day I arose and went to the house in as good  health as I ever enjoyed. at one oclock came to where we were and said that his [p. [5], bk. 15]
daughter and her husband [blank] should stay with and that and the remainder of the party would make what speed they could to with me for I was no longer able to ride in a sitting posture but laid on a bedstead with my [face] carefully covered as the fresh air kept me coughing continually My did not much expect me to live to the end of the journey for in going to I could not travel sometimes more than 4 miles a day— but as soon as we arrived at there he sought a place where we might stop sometime and all that nursing would do for me might be done— It was my own request going [a]s far as but they did not know why I urged the matter the fact was I had an impression that if I could get there and by some means be able to by the assistance of walking sticks to find a place where I would be secluded and uninterrupted in calling upon the Lord that I might be healed accordingly I siezed upon a time when they were engaged and by the aid of staffs I reached A fence and then followed the fence some distance till I came to a dense hazel thicket here I threw myself on the ground and thought it was no matter how far I was from the house for if the Lord would not hear me and I must die I might as well die here as any where when I was a little rested I began to call upon God to beseech his mercy praying for my health and that the life of my daughter : I urged every claim which the scriptures gives us and was as humble as I knew how to be and I continued praying near 3 hours. I at last was entirely releived from pain and my cough left me and I was well moreover I received an assurance that I should hear from my sick about the middle of the same day I arose and went to the house in as good health as I ever enjoyed. at one oclock came to where we were and said that his [p. [5], bk. 15]
Page [5], bk. 15