Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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umber of extracts before I get through <conclude my> with my detail <narrative>
My Parents (My Father) writes as follows. I was born in in the town of Lime near the mouth of the Connecticut river Sept 26— 1735 My Parents<Father> were <was> <a man> people of a large property, lived in good style, <&> commanding <commanded> all that respect which is ever paid to those <who> living <live> <in> fine circumstances and strict habits of morality. and for some length of time, they lived in peace and plenty, enjoing <all> the good of their labors. But at length a series of misfortunes visited them occasioned, in most instances, by the perfidy of their fellow <man> which reduced by degrees till at last they came to penury and want to that extent that A once happy and flourishing family wer compelled to disperse and throw themselves upo[n] the charity of <a cold,>an unfeeling world.
I was bound to a farmer in the neighborhood As is too commonly the case, I was considered rather as a Slave than as a member of the family, and instead of allowing me the priviledges of common hospitality and a claim to, that kind of protection due to helpless and indigent children, I was treated by my Master as his property and not as his fellow mortal.
Soon after I left my Master, (which <was> I did at the age of 21 years) I enlisted in the service<s> of My Country under the command of capt. Henry; and was annexed to the regiment commanded by Col Whiting. I marched from to fort Edwards and was in a severe battle fought at half way brook <in> 1755. In the year 1757, I was in the Kings se[r]vice and being one morning out on a short excu[r]sion with a friend named Webster, I was traveling along about 20 rods in <advance> of my companion [p. 2, bk. [1]]
umber of extracts before I conclude my with narrative
(My Father) writes as follows. I was born in in the town of Lime near the mouth of the Connecticut river Sept 26— 1735 My Father was a man people of property, lived in good style, & commanded all that respect which is ever paid to those who live in fine circumstances and strict habits of morality. for some time, they lived in peace and plenty, enjoing all the good of their labors. But at length a series of misfortunes visited them occasioned, in most instances, by the perfidy of their fellow man which reduced by degrees at last they came to penury and want A once happy and flourishing family wer compelled to disperse and throw themselves upon the charity of a cold, unfeeling world.
I was bound to a farmer in the neighborhood As is too commonly the case, I was considered rather a Slave than a member of the family, and instead of allowing me the priviledge of common hospitality , that kind of protection due to helpless and indigent children, I was treated by my Master as his property and not as his fellow mortal.
Soon after I left my Master, (which was at the age of 21 years) I enlisted in the services of My Country under the command of capt. Henry; and was annexed to the regiment commanded by Col Whiting. I marched from to fort Edwards and was in a severe battle fought at half way brook in 1755. In the year 1757, I was in the Kings service and being one morning out on a short excursion with a friend named Webster, I was traveling along about 20 rods in advance of my companion [p. 2, bk. [1]]
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