Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [10], [miscellany]
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[4 words illegible]ry which is thus, my hi   [4 words illegible]dge untill the farm was sold   [4 words illegible]lton N B revisers
 
During the time in which was [re] flecting seriously upon the subject of religion The  and while we were yet living in the Town of Tun bridge I was very seriously impressed the subj[ect]  of religion occasioned probably by my singular  experience while sick at Randolf and I endeavor ed to persuade my to attend the Methodist  meeting with me he went a few times to grat[ify]  me for he had so little faith in the doctrines taug ht by them that my feelings were the only inducem ent for him to go— But as soon as his Father and  brother Jesse [Smith] heard that we were attending methodist  meeting they were much displeased and his father  came to the door one day and threw Tom Pain’s age  of reason into the house and angrily bade him read  that untill he believed it they also told him that  he ought not to let his go to the meetings  and it would be far better for him to stop going  this gave me very accordingly my re quested me not to go as it gave our friends such  disagreeable feelings he thought it was hardly wor th our while to go— I was very much hurt by  this but did not reply to him then but retired  to a grove of handsome wild cherry trees and pray ed to the Lord that he <would> do so influence the heart of  my that he would be <one day> induced to rec [ei]ve the Gospel whenever it was preached. I  [s]pent some time in prayer and returned to  the house much depressed in spirits. That nigh t I had the following dream—
’s Dream
Thou Thought that I was standing in a beautiful <pleasant> meadow  which I was well acquainted with and I was looking  [aro]und and admiring the beauty <loveliness> of the scenery when [p. [10], [miscellany]]
ry which is thus, my hi dge untill the farm was sold lton N B reviser
 
while we were yet living in the Town of Tunbridge I was very seriously impressed the subject of religion occasioned probably by my singular experience while sick at Randolf and I endeavored to persuade my to attend the Methodist meeting with me he went a few times to gratify me for he had so little faith in the doctrines taught by them that my feelings were the only inducement for him to go— But as soon as his Father and brother Jesse [Smith] heard that we were attending methodist meeting they were much displeased and his father came to the door one day and threw Tom Pain’s age of reason into the house and angrily bade him read that untill he believed it they also told him that he ought not to let his go to the meetings and it would be far better for him to stop going accordingly my requested me not to go as it gave our friends such disagreeable feelings he thought it was hardly worth our while — I was very much hurt by this but did not reply to him then but retired to a grove of handsome wild cherry trees and prayed to the Lord that he would so influence the heart of my that he would be one day induced to receive the Gospel whenever it was preached. I spent some time in prayer and returned to the house much depressed in spirits. That night I had the following dream—
’s Dream
Thought that I was standing in a pleasant meadow which I was well acquainted with and I was looking around and admiring the loveliness of the scenery when [p. [10], [miscellany]]
Page [10], [miscellany]