Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 114
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Chapter 24
Chap. 24.
 
Joseph brings home the breast plate  and his introducedThe translation commences  begins to oppose the work
 
After bringing the plates home, Joseph com menced working with his and brothers on  the farm, in order to be as near as possible to  the treasure, which was now confided to his  care.
Soon after this he came in from work in the  afternoon, and after remaining a short time, he  put on his great coat, and left the house. I  was engaged at the time in an upper room in pre paring some oil cloths for painting. When he returned  he requested me to come down stairs. I told him  I could not leave my work just then; but, after as  he still insisted I finally concluded to go down  and see what he wanted. After Upon meeting him,  he handed me the breastplate spoken of in his  history. It was wrapped in a thin muslin han dkerchief; so thin that I could see the glistening  metal, and ascertain <feel> its proportions without any  difficulty: It was concave on one side and  convex on the other; and extended from the neck  downwards as far as the centre of the stomach  of a man of extraordinary size. It had four  straps of the same material for the purpose  of fastening it to the breast: two of which ran  back to go over the shoulders, and the other two  were designed to fasten to the hips. These straps [p. 114]
Chapter 24
Chap. 24.
 
Joseph brings home the breast plate and his introducedThe translation commences begins to oppose the work
 
After bringing the plates home, Joseph commenced working with his and brothers on the farm, in order to be as near as possible to the treasure, which was now confided to his care.
Soon after this he came in from work in the afternoon, and after remaining a short time, he put on his great coat, and left the house. I was engaged at the time in an upper room in preparing some oil cloths for painting. When he returned he requested me to come down stairs. I told him I could not leave my work just then; but, as he still insisted I finally concluded to go down and see what he wanted. Upon meeting him, he handed me the breastplate spoken of in his history. It was wrapped in a thin muslin handkerchief; so thin that I could feel its proportions without any difficulty: It was concave on one side and convex on the other; and extended from the neck downwards as far as the centre of the stomach of a man of extraordinary size. It had four straps of the same material for the purpose of fastening it to the breast: two of which ran back to go over the shoulders, and the other two were designed to fasten to the hips. These straps [p. 114]
Page 114