Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 125
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then said: “I have been walking about in the woods  to look at the situation of your place, and, as  I turned round to come home a tremendous black  snake stuck up his head before me and commenced  hissing at me.”
The was so perplexed and disappointed in  all her undertakings that she left the house and took  lodgings [3 words illegible] during her stay in with a  near neighbor: who where <she> stated that the day previous  she had been hunting for the plates; and after a  tedious search, she came to spot where she jud ged by the appearance of things they must be  burried; but upon stooping down to scrape away  the snow and leaves in order to ascertain the  fact, she encountered a horrible black snake;  which gave her a terrible fight, and she ran  with all possible speed to the house.
While this remained in the neighborhood,  she did all that lay in her power to injure Joseph  in the estimation of his neighbors; telling them  that he was a grand imposter, and, by his specious  pretentions, had seduced her into the be lief, that himself was some great one, merely from  a design upon his property.
When she returned home, which was about two  weeks after her arrival in (the name of  the place where Joseph resided) she endeavored to  dissuade her from taking any farther part  in the publication of the record; but  paid no attention to her, but returned and contin ued writing.
Immediately after left home for , his went from place to place, and [p. 125]
then said: “I have been walking about in the woods to look at the situation of your place, and, as I turned round to come home a tremendous black snake stuck up his head before me and commenced hissing at me.”
The was so perplexed and disappointed in all her undertakings that she left the house and took lodgings during her stay in with a near neighbor: where she stated that the day previous she had been hunting for the plates; and after a tedious search, she came to spot where she judged by the appearance of things they must be burried; but upon stooping down to scrape away the snow and leaves in order to ascertain the fact, she encountered a horrible black snake; which gave her a terrible fight, and she ran with all possible speed to the house.
While this remained in the neighborhood, she did all that lay in her power to injure Joseph in the estimation of his neighbors; telling them that he was a grand imposter, and, by his specious pretentions, had seduced her into the belief, that himself was some great one, merely from a design upon his property.
When she returned home, which was about two weeks after her arrival in (the name of the place where Joseph resided) she endeavored to dissuade her from taking any farther part in the publication of the record; but paid no attention to her, but returned and continued writing.
Immediately after left home for , his went from place to place, and [p. 125]
Page 125