Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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from house to house, telling her grievances, and decl aring that Joseph Smith was practicing a deception upon  the people, which was about to strip her of all that  she possessed; and that she was compelled to deposit  a few things away from home in order to secure them.  So she carried away her furniture, linen, and bedding;  also, other moveable articles, until she nearly stripped  the premises of every thing that could conduce either  to comfort or convenience; depositing them with those  of her friends and acquaintances, in whom she rep osed sufficient confidence to assure her of their fu ture safety.
 

Chapter 25

Chap. 25.
 
is permitted to take the manuscript  home with himhe looses itSeason of mourning  which ensued
 
, having written some 116 pages for Joseph,  asked permission of him to carry the manuscript home  with him in order to let his read it, as he  hoped it might have a salutory effict upon her feel ings.
Joseph was willing to gratify his friend, as far as  he could consistently, and he inquired of the Lord to  know if he might do as had requested; but  was refused.
With this was not altogether satisfied;  and, upon his urgent request Joseph inquired again; [p. 126]
from house to house, telling her grievances, and declaring that Joseph Smith was practicing a deception upon the people, which was about to strip her of all that she possessed; and that she was compelled to deposit a few things away from home in order to secure them. So she carried away her furniture, linen, and bedding; also, other moveable articles, until she nearly stripped the premises of every thing that could conduce either to comfort or convenience; depositing them with those of her friends and acquaintances, in whom she reposed sufficient confidence to assure her of their future safety.
 

Chapter 25

Chap. 25.
 
is permitted to take the manuscript home with himhe looses itSeason of mourning which ensued
 
, having written some 116 pages for Joseph, asked permission of him to carry the manuscript home in order to let his read it, as he hoped it might have a salutory effict upon her feelings.
Joseph was willing to gratify his friend, as far as he could consistently, and he inquired of the Lord to know if he might do as had requested; but was refused.
With this was not altogether satisfied; and, upon his urgent request Joseph inquired again; [p. 126]
Page 126