Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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but received a second refusal: still, per sisted as before, and Joseph applied again. This  time he received an answer not like the two former  ones: In this the Lord permitted to take the  manuscript home with him, on condition that he would  exhibit it none save five individuals, whom he had  mentioned, and who belonged to his own family.
With this was delighted, and bound  himself in a written covenant of the most solemn na ture, that he would strictly comply with the in junctions which he had received: this being done  he took the manuscript and went home.
As Joseph did not suspect, but that his friend  would keep his faith, he gave himself no uneasiness  in regard to the matter.
Shortly after left, became the mother  of a ; but it remained with her but a short time  before for it was <soon> snatched from its mother’s arms by  the hand of death. And the for some time  seemed more like sinking with her infant into the mansion  of the dead, than remaining with her husband among  the living: her situation was such, that for two weeks  Joseph slept not an hour in undisturbed quiet: but, at  the expiration of this time, she began to recover. however, and  his anxiety about her continued to amend until she <her> <health> was [illegible] again restored.  But, as his anxiety about her bagan to subside another  cause of trouble forced itself upon his mind:  had been absent nearly three weeks, and Joseph had recei ved no intelligence whatever from him; which was alto gether aside of the arrangement when they separated.  Yet Joseph kept his feelings from , fearing that,  if she became acquainted with them, it might agit ate her too much. In a few days, however, she men [p. 127]
but received a second refusal: still, persisted as before, and Joseph applied again. This time he received an answer not like the two former ones: In this the Lord permitted to take the manuscript home with him, on condition that he would exhibit it none save five individuals, whom he had mentioned, and who belonged to his own family.
With this was delighted, and bound himself in a written covenant of the most solemn nature, that he would strictly comply with the injunctions which he had received: this being done he took the manuscript and went home.
As Joseph did not suspect, but that his friend would keep his faith, he gave himself no uneasiness in regard to the matter.
Shortly after left, became the mother of a ; but it remained with her but a short time for it was soon snatched from its mother’s arms by the hand of death. And the for some time seemed more like sinking with her infant into the mansion of the dead, than remaining with her husband among the living: her situation was such, that for two weeks Joseph slept not an hour in undisturbed quiet: , at the expiration of this time, she began to recover. and continued to amend until her health was restored. But, as his anxiety about her bagan to subside another cause of trouble forced itself upon his mind: had been absent nearly three weeks, and Joseph had received no intelligence whatever from him; which was altogether aside of the arrangement when they separated. Yet Joseph kept his feelings from , fearing that, if she became acquainted with them, it might agitate her too much. In a few days, however, she men [p. 127]
Page 127