Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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tioned the subject herself; and requested Joseph to go  and get her to stay with her, while he should  repair to for the purpose of learning the cause  of ’ absence, as well as silence. At  first, Joseph objected to this measure; but seeing her  so cheerful, and so willing to have him leave home  he finally consented. Accordingly, he set  out in the first stage that passed for New York;  and when he was left to himself, and began to  comtemplate the course which had taken,  and the risk which he had run in letting the  manuscript go out of his hands; that this it could  not be obtained again, in case had lost  it through transgression, except by the power of God;  which was something he could hardly hope for:—  that by persisting in his entreaties to the Lord he  had perhaps fallen into transgression, and thereby  lost the manuscript: When, I say, he began to  contemplate these things, the spirit [3 words illegible] they troubled his spirit,  and his soul was moved with fearful apprehen sions; and, although hewas now nearly worn out,  sleep fleed from his eyes; neither had he any desire  for food; for he felt that he had done wrong,  and how great his condemnation was, he did not  know. Only one passenger was in the place stage  besides himself. This man observing Joseph’s gloo my appearance inquired the cause of his affection <affliction>,  and offered to assist him, if his services would  be acceptable. Joseph thanked him for his kind ness; and mentioned, that he had been watching some  time with a sick and ; that the  had died, and his was still very low;  but did not give any farther explanation. [p. 128]
tioned the subject herself; and requested Joseph to go and get her to stay with her, while he should repair to for the purpose of learning the cause of ’ absence, as well as silence. At first, Joseph objected to this measure; but seeing her so cheerful, and so willing to have him leave home he finally consented. Accordingly, he set out in the first stage that passed for ; and when he was left to himself, and began to comtemplate the course which had taken, and the risk which he had run in letting the manuscript go out of his hands; that it could not be obtained again, in case had lost it through transgression, except by the power of God; which was something he could hardly hope for:— that by persisting in his entreaties to the Lord he had perhaps fallen into transgression, and thereby lost the manuscript: When, I say, he began to contemplate these things, they troubled his spirit, and his soul was moved with fearful apprehensions; and, although hewas now nearly worn out, sleep fleed from his eyes; neither had he any desire for food; for he felt that he had done wrong, and how great his condemnation was, he did not know. Only one passenger was in the stage besides himself. This man observing Joseph’s gloomy appearance inquired the cause of his affliction, and offered to assist him, if his services would be acceptable. Joseph thanked him for his kindness; and mentioned, that he had been watching some time with a sick and ; that the had died, and his was still very low; but did not give any farther explanation. [p. 128]
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