Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 135
that, if a continual punishment, as severe as that which we experienced on that occasion, were to be inflicted upon the most wicked characters, who ever stood upon the footstool of the Almighty; if I say, their punishment was even no greater than this. I should feel to pity the condition of the most depraved.
 
Chapter 27
Chap. 27.
 
Urim and Thummim is taken from Josephhe receives them again
 
For nearly two months after Joseph returned to his family in we heard nothing from him; and becoming anxious about him, and set off to make him a visit. When we came withing three quarters of a mile of the his house, Joseph started to meet us; telling his as he left, that “ and were coming.”
When he met us his countenance wore so pleasant an aspect, that I was convinced he had something agreeable to communicate, in relation to the work in which he was engaged. And when I entered his house the first thing that attracted [p. 135]
that, if a continual punishment, as severe as that which we experienced on that occasion, were to be inflicted upon the most wicked characters, who ever stood upon the footstool of the Almighty; if I say, their punishment was even no greater than this. I should feel to pity the condition of the most depraved.
 
Chapter 27
Chap. 27.
 
Urim and Thummim is taken from Josephhe receives them again
 
For nearly two months after Joseph returned to his family in we heard nothing from him; and becoming anxious about him, and set off to make him a visit. When we came withing three quarters of a mile of his house, Joseph started to meet us; telling his as he left, that “ and were coming.”
When he met us his countenance wore so pleasant an aspect, that I was convinced he had something agreeable to communicate, in relation to the work in which he was engaged. And when I entered his house the first thing that attracted [p. 135]
Page 135