Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 140
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Chapter 28
Chap. 28.
 
commences writing for Josephthey attend to the ordinance of baptism
 
When [illegible] <and> arrived at home we found and very sick; indeed they were so low that had left his own house and quit business in order to take care of them: they continued sick a length of time, in particular, did not altogether recover for a number of months.
In a short time after our arrival from , a man by the name of Lyman Cowdery came into the neighborhood, and applied to (as he was one of the Trustees) for the district school. A meeting of the trustees was called, and Mr. Cowdery was employed. But, on the day following, this Mr. Cowdery brought his brother, , to the trustees, and requested them to receive him instead of himself; for as circumstances had transpired which compelled him (Lyman) to disappoint them, or, that would not allow of his attending to the school; and he said, that he would warrant the good conduct of the school under his brother<’s> supervision. The [3 words illegible] trustees being satisfied with this arrangement, commenced his school; and came to our house to board. He had been in the school but a short time, when he began to hear concerning the plates from all quarters; as and as soon began to importune upon the subject; but did not succeed in [p. 140]
Chapter 28
Chap. 28.
 
commences writing for Joseph— — they attend to the ordinance of baptism
 
When and arrived at home we found and very sick; indeed they were so low that had left his own house and quit business in order to take care of them: they continued sick a length of time, in particular, did not altogether recover for a number of months.
In a short time after our arrival from , a man by the name of Lyman Cowdery came into the neighborhood, and applied to (as he was one of the Trustees) for the district school. A meeting of the trustees was called, and Mr. Cowdery was employed. But, on the day following, this Mr. Cowdery brought his brother, , to the trustees, and requested them to receive him instead of himself; as circumstances had transpired which compelled him (Lyman) to disappoint them, or, that would not allow of his attending to the school; and he said, that he would warrant the good conduct of the school under his brother’s supervision. The trustees being satisfied with this arrangement, commenced his school; and came to our house to board. He had been in the school but a short time, when he began to hear concerning the plates from all quarters; and as soon began to importune upon the subject; but did not succeed in [p. 140]
Page 140