Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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out starting gave Jesse his hand in a pleas ant affectionate manner, and said, farewell brother  Jesse.” “Farewell forever: replied Jesse in a sur ly tone.” “I am afraid,” returned , in a kind  but solemn manner, “it will be forever unless you repent.”
“This was too much, for even jesse’s obdurate heart:  he melted into tears; however, he made no reply nor  even mentioned the circumstance afterwards.
“I took my 20 miles on his journey the next  day, as I had agreed. Before he left me, he reque sted me to promise him, that I <would read> a Book of mormon which  he had given me; and even should I not believe it, th at I would not condemn it, “for,” said he, “if you do not  condemn it, you shall have a testimony of its truth.’”  I fulfilled my promise, and thus proved his testimony to  be true.”
I shall now drop brother ’s journal, and  again pursue my story. Just before my ’s r eturn, as Joseph was about commencing a discourse one  Sunday morning came in <to our meeting>, very much  fatigued: he had heard of us at some considerable distance  and travelled very fast in order <to get> there by meeting time;  as he wished to hear what we had to say, that he might  be prepared to show us our error. But when Joseph <he>  had <heard> finished his <the> discourse, arose and expressed  his hearty concurance in every sentiment advanced; and  the following day he was <soon after> baptized and ordained. In  a few <days> he set off for Cainaan N. Y. where his brother   resided; whom he baptized on the 19 of sept. 1830
After Joseph ordained , he went home ag ain to ; for he was only in  on business. About this time his <Joseph’s> trouble commenced at   with the mob; who served a writ upon him [p. 176]
out starting gave Jesse his hand in a pleasant affectionate manner, and said, farewell brother Jesse.” “Farewell forever: replied Jesse in a surly tone.” “I am afraid,” returned , in a kind but solemn manner, “it will be forever unless you repent.”
“This was too much, for even jesse’s obdurate heart: he melted into tears; however, he made no reply nor even mentioned the circumstance afterwards.
“I took my 20 miles on his journey the next day, as I had agreed. Before he left me, he requested me to promise him, that I would read a Book of mormon which he had given me; and even should I not believe it, that I would not condemn it, “for,” said he, “if you do not condemn it, you shall have a testimony of its truth.’” I fulfilled my promise, and thus proved his testimony to be true.”
I shall now drop brother ’s journal, and again pursue my story. Just before my ’s return, one Sunday morning came in to our meeting, very much fatigued: he had heard of us at some considerable distance and travelled very fast in order to get there by meeting time; as he wished to hear what we had to say, that he might be prepared to show us our error. But when he had heard finished the discourse, arose and expressed his hearty concurance in every sentiment advanced; and he was soon after baptized and ordained. In a few days he set off for Cainaan N. Y. where his brother resided; whom he baptized on the 19 of sept. 1830
About this time Joseph’s trouble commenced at with the mob; who served a writ upon him [p. 176]
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