Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 177
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and him from the desk as he was about taking his text to preach. But as a relation of this is given in Joseph’s history,* <* see Times and Seasons vol. 4.th Pges 40. &. 61.> I shall mention only one circumstance pertaining to it for which I am dependant upon , who was Josep’s counsel in the case and I shall relate it as near in his own words as my my memory will admit:
“I was said , so busy at the time when Mr. Smith sent for me, that it was almost impossible for me to attend the case, and <never> having seen M. smith, I determined to decline going; but soon after coming to the conclusion, I thought I heard some one say to me, “you must go and deliver the Lord’s Anointed” supposing that it was the man who came after me, I said replied, “the Lord’s Anointed? What do you mean by the Lord’s Anointed.” He was surprised at being accosted in this manner, and said, what do you mean sir? I said nothing about the Lord’s Anointed. I was convinced that he told the truth; for these few words filled my mind with peculiar feelings, such as I had never before experienced; and I immediately hastened to the place of trial. Whilst <I was> engaged in this the case, these emmotions increased; and when I came to speak upon it, I was inspired to an eloquence, which was altogether new to me, and which, was overpowering and irresistable: I succeeded, as I expected, in obtaining the prisoners discharge. This the more enraged the adverse party, and I soon discovered that Mr. smith was liable to abuse from them, should he not make his escape. The most of them being fond of liquor. I invited them into another room to drink, and thus succeeded in attracting their attention untill Mr smith was b[e]yond their reach: I knew not where he went; but I was satisfied that he was out of their hands.” [p. 177]
and him from the desk as he was about taking his text to preach. But as a relation of this is given in Joseph’s history,* * see Times and Seasons vol. 4.th Pges 40. &. 61. I shall mention only one circumstance pertaining to it for which I am dependant upon , who was Josep’s counsel in the case and I shall relate it as near in his own words as my my memory will admit:
“I was said , so busy at the time when Mr. Smith sent for me, that it was almost impossible for me to attend the case, and never having seen M. smith, I determined to decline going; but soon after coming to the conclusion, I thought I heard some one say to me, “you must go and deliver the Lord’s Anointed” supposing that it was the man who came after me, I replied, “the Lord’s Anointed? What do you mean by the Lord’s Anointed.” He was surprised at being accosted in this manner, and said, what do you mean sir? I said nothing about the Lord’s Anointed. I was convinced that he told the truth; for these few words filled my mind with peculiar feelings, such as I had never before experienced; and I immediately hastened to the place of trial. Whilst I was engaged in the case, these emmotions increased; and when I came to speak upon it, I was inspired to an eloquence, which was altogether new to me, and which, was overpowering and irresistable: I succeeded, as I expected, in obtaining the prisoners discharge. This the more enraged the adverse party, and I soon discovered that Mr. smith was liable to abuse from them, should he not make his escape. The most of them being fond of liquor. I invited them into another room to drink, and thus succeeded in attracting their attention untill Mr smith was beyond their reach: I knew not where he went; but I was satisfied that he was out of their hands.” [p. 177]
Page 177