Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 185
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a heavy cold and my bones ache dreadfully.” However, by  morning and some rest, he was able to set off by sunrise  and arrived at at 10 O’Clock. After inform ing the jailor of his business, he requested, that his  might be immediately liberated from the cell; but the  jailor refused, because it was sunday; but permited to go into the cell, where he found my confin ed in the same dungeon with a Man committed for mu rder; and, upon enquiring what his treatment had been,   replied as follows:—
“Immediately after I left your , the men by whom  I was taken commenced using every possible argument to in duce me to renounce the Book of Mormon; saying ho w much better it would be for you to deny that silly  thing, than to be disgraced, and imprisoned, when you might,  not only escape, but also have the note back; as well as  the money you have paid on it. “To this continued my  , I made no reply: And They still went on in  the same manner untill we arrived at the jail; when they  hurried me into this dismal dungeon.— I shuddered when I  first heard these heavy doors creaking upon their hinges;  but then, I thought to myself, I was not the first  man, who had been imprisoned for the truth’s sake. An d when I should meet Paul in the paradise of God, I co uld tell him, that I too had been in bonds for gosp el which he preached. And this has been my only conso lation.
From the time that I entered untill now, and this is  the fourth day, I have had nothing to eat, save a  pint basin full of very weak broth. And there, said  he, (pointing to the opposite of the cell) lies the ba sin yet.”
was very much wounded by this; and having [p. 185]
a heavy cold and my bones ache dreadfully.” However, by morning and some rest, he was able to set off by sunrise and arrived at at 10 O’Clock. After informing the jailor of his business, he requested, that his might be immediately liberated from the cell; but the jailor refused, because it was sunday; but permited to go into the cell, where he found my confined in the same dungeon with a Man committed for murder; and, upon enquiring what his treatment had been, replied as follows:—
“Immediately after I left your , the men by whom I was taken commenced using every possible argument to induce me to renounce the Book of Mormon; saying how much better it would be for you to deny that silly thing, than to be disgraced, and imprisoned, when you might, not only escape, but also have the note back; as well as the money you have paid on it. “To this continued my , I made no reply: And They still went on in the same manner untill we arrived at the jail; when they hurried me into this dismal dungeon.— I shuddered when I first heard these heavy doors creaking upon their hinges; but then, I thought to myself, I was not the first man, who had been imprisoned for the truth’s sake. And when I should meet Paul in the paradise of God, I could tell him, that I too had been in bonds for gospel which he preached. And this has been my only consolation.
From the time that I entered untill now, and this is the fourth day, I have had nothing to eat, save a pint basin full of very weak broth. And there, said he, (pointing to the opposite of the cell) lies the basin yet.”
was very much wounded by this; and having [p. 185]
Page 185