Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 203
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res to heaven, that the ice may be broke up, and we be set at  liberty, as sure as the Lord lives it will be done.” At that instant  a noise was heard like bursting thunder. The Captain cried,  “Every man to his post.”— The ice parted, leaving barely a pathway  for the boat; and that so narrow that as the boat passed throu gh the buckets of the waterwheel were entirely torn off with a  crash, which, joined to the word of command from the captain  the hoarse a[ns]wering of the sailors, together the noise of the ice,  and the cries and confusion of the spectators presented a scene  truly sublime and terrible. We had barely passed through  the avenue when the ice closed together again; and the brethren were left in unable to follow us. As  we were leaving the Harbor, one of the bystanders exclaimed  there goes the Mormon company; and that boat is sunk in the  water 9 inches deeper than ever it was before— and mark it  she will sink there is nothing surer; (in fact they were so sure  of it that they went straight to the office, and had it publish ed that we had sunk; so that when we arrived at ,  we read the news of our own death in the Newspapers.)
After our miraculous escape from the wharf at ,  we called our company together and had a kind of prayer m eeting in which we offered up our thanks to God, for his mercy  which he had manifested towards us in our deliverance; but before  our meeting was broken up, the captains mate came to me and  said, , do for God’s sake, have your children stop  praying or we shall all go together to Hell together: we cannot  keep one single man to his post, if we should go to the devil,  for they are so taken up with your praying.” Therefore our  meeting was broken up.
Soon after leaving some our company began  to feel the effects of the motion of the boat, and were thrown  upon their backs with sea sickness. Not having engaged  water for the voyage, they suffered great anxiety I on this acc [p. 203]
res to heaven, that the ice may be broke up, and we be set at liberty, as sure as the Lord lives it will be done.” At that instant a noise was heard like bursting thunder. The Captain cried, “Every man to his post.”— The ice parted, leaving barely a pathway for the boat; and that so narrow that as the boat passed through the buckets of the waterwheel were torn off with a crash, which, joined to the word of command from the captain the hoarse answering of the sailors, together the noise of the ice, and the cries and confusion of the spectators presented a scene truly sublime and terrible. We had barely passed through the avenue when the ice closed together again; and the brethren were left in unable to follow us. As we were leaving the Harbor, one of the bystanders exclaimed there goes the Mormon company; and that boat is sunk in the water 9 inches deeper than ever it was before— and mark it she will sink there is nothing surer; (in fact they were so sure of it that they went straight to the office, and had it published that we had sunk; so that when we arrived at , we read the news of our own death in the Newspapers.)
After our miraculous escape from the wharf at , we called our company together and had a kind of prayer meeting in which we offered up our thanks to God, for his mercy which he had manifested towards us in our deliverance; but before our meeting was broken up, the captains mate came to me and said, , do for God’s sake, have your children stop praying or we shall all go to Hell together: we cannot keep one single man to his post, if we should go to the devil, for they are so taken up with your praying.” Therefore our meeting was broken up.
Soon after leaving some our company began to feel the effects of the motion of the boat, and were thrown upon their backs with sea sickness. Not having engaged water for the voyage, they suffered great anxiety on this acc [p. 203]
Page 203