Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ount. But I went to the cook, and handing him 25 cents, asked  him of he could let me have some hot water for the sick  folks. He complied with my request; and I was thus  furnished with the means of making them comforta ble.
Upon further acquaintance with the Captain, I made  myself known to him, as the sister of Gen. Mack. He seemed  highly pleased to find in me a relation relative of his old friend;  and I was treated with great attention and respect both by  himself and the crew, while I remained on the boat.
A short time before we arrived at , and went on shore to do some trading for  the company. While on shore this told me that I  was making a slave of myself unnecessarily; that those sist ers, whose families I had taken care of, could as well wait  upon their own husbands and children as for me to do it; that,  as for himself, he was not going to stay on board much longer.
I thanked him for his kindness, but told him, that I thought  I could get along with the work, without injuring myself.  Nothing farther passed between us upon the subject. At the  next landing he left us; and whither he went I did not know.
On drawing near , where we were to land, the  captain passengers and crew bade me farewell in tears. Af ter landing, our company were more disheartened than ever;  and the brethren came around me and requested that I should  set their wives to sewing up blankets together, and mak ing tents of them, that the men might camp by their goods  and watch them, for they had no hopes of getting any  farther. I told them I should do nothing of the kind.  As for the sisters, some of them were crying, some pouting  and a few of them were attending to the care of their fam ilies. As I passed among them, my attention was att racted by a stranger, who sat a short distance from us on [p. 204]
ount. But I went to the cook, and handing him 25 cents, asked him of he could let me have some hot water for the sick folks. He complied with my request; and I was thus furnished with the means of making them comfortable.
Upon further acquaintance with the Captain, I made myself known to him, as the sister of Gen. Mack. He seemed highly pleased to find in me a relative of his old friend; and I was treated with great attention and respect both by himself and the crew, while I remained on the boat.
A short time before we arrived at , and went on shore to do some trading for the company. While on shore this told me that I was making a slave of myself unnecessarily; that those sisters, whose families I had taken care of, could as well wait upon their own husbands and children as for me to do it; that, as for himself, he was not going to stay on board much longer.
I thanked him for his kindness, but told him, that I thought I could get along with the work, without injuring myself. Nothing farther passed between us upon the subject. At the next landing he left us; and whither he went I did not know.
On drawing near , where we were to land, the captain passengers and crew bade me farewell in tears. After landing, our company were more disheartened than ever; and the brethren came around me and requested that I should set their wives to sewing blankets together, and making tents of them, that the men might camp by their goods and watch them, for they had no hopes of getting any farther. I told them I should do nothing of the kind. As for the sisters, some of them were crying, some pouting and a few of them were attending to the care of their families. As I passed among them, my attention was attracted by a stranger, who sat a short distance from us on [p. 204]
Page 204