Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 208
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be not seperated untill they return to their homes, and this for  a wise purpose in me.” And here let me say that was  never censured by revelation to my knowledge; for he always  performed his missions faithfully and his work was well approved.
 
Chapter 41
Chap. 41.
 
visits
 
As , my oldest son, was directed to go to  by the way of Detroit, I thought it would be a good opportu nity to visit the family of my brother, Gen. [Stephen] Mack. Accord ingly, I with my niece, , , and brother<s>  , and brother , set out together  for . When we first went on on board the vessel,  which took us accross the Lake we concluded to keep perfectly  still upon the subject of religion; but it was afterwards prop osed by that should say just what she ple ased, and if she got into difficulty, the elders should help her  out of it. Shortly after this, I was setting at the door of the  cabin reading the Book of Mormon, when a lady came  up and enquired of me what book I was reading. The Bo ok of Mormon I replied. But the title of the book was  no advantage to her; for she had never before heard of  there being such a book in existence. By her request  I gave her a brief history of the discovery and translation  of the book. This delighted her; and when I mentioned that  it was a record of the origin of the Aboriginees of [p. 208]
be not seperated untill they return to their homes, and this for a wise purpose in me.” And here let me say that was never censured by revelation to my knowledge; for he always performed his missions faithfully and his work was well approved.
 
Chapter 41
Chap. 41.
 
visits
 
As , my oldest son, was directed to go to by the way of Detroit, I thought it would be a good opportunity to visit the family of my brother, Gen. Stephen Mack. Accordingly, I with my niece, , , and brothers , and , set out together for . When we first went on on board the vessel, which took us accross the Lake we concluded to keep perfectly still upon the subject of religion; but it was afterwards proposed by that should say just what she pleased, and if she got into difficulty, the elders should help her out of it. Shortly after this, I was setting at the door of the cabin reading the Book of Mormon, when a lady came up and enquired of me what book I was reading. The Book of Mormon I replied. But the title of the book was no advantage to her; for she had never before heard of there being such a book in existence. By her request I gave her a brief history of the discovery and translation of the book. This delighted her; and when I mentioned that it was a record of the origin of the Aboriginees of [p. 208]
Page 208