Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 212
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said “I do not know that it would, , you know that  these are more common things.”
I then told her that I would excuse her, and, that she  might go where she pleased; concluding in my own mind ne ver to mention the subject to her again; unless it should  be by her own request. That night we slept in the  same room. When I was about retiring to rest she obser ved, “do not let my presence prevent you from attending  to any duty which you have practiced at home. And  soon afterwards she again remarked “The house is now still  and I would be glad to hear you talk if you are not  too much fatigued.” I told her, I would have no ob jection, provided the subject of religion would not  make her nervous; and as she did not think it would,  we commenced conversation; the result of which was, she was  convinced of the truth of the gospel.
In a few days we all subsequent to this we all set  out to visit Mrs. Stanly, who was also my brothers daughter.  Here Mr. Whitermore gave me an introduction to one  Mr Ruggles the Pastor of the presbyterian church to w hich Mr Whitermore belonged.
“And you” said Mr Ruggles,” upon shakeing  hands with me, “are the mother of that poor foolish, silly,  boy, Joe Smith; who pretended to translate the Book  of Mormon.”
I looked him steadily in the face and replied,  “I am sir, the of Joseph smith; but why do you  apply to him such epithets as those.”
“Because,” said his reverance, “that he should imagine  that he was going to break down all other churches with  that simple Mormon Book.”
“Did you ever read that book,” I enquired.
“No,” said he, “it is beneath my notice.” [p. 212]
said “I do not know that it would, , you know that these are more common things.”
I then told her that I would excuse her, and, that she might go where she pleased; concluding in my own mind never to mention the subject to her again; unless it should be by her own request. That night we slept in the same room. When I was about retiring to rest she observed, “do not let my presence prevent you from attending to any duty which you have practiced at home. soon afterwards she again remarked “The house is now still and I would be glad to hear you talk if you are not too much fatigued.” I told her, I would have no objection, provided the subject of religion would not make her nervous; and as she did not think it would, we commenced conversation; the result of which was, she was convinced of the truth of the gospel.
In a few days subsequent to this we all set out to visit Mrs. Stanly, who was also my brothers daughter. Here Mr. Whitermore gave me an introduction to one Mr Ruggles the Pastor of the presbyterian church to which Mr Whitermore belonged.
“And you” said Mr Ruggles,” upon shakeing hands with me, “are the mother of that poor foolish, silly, boy, Joe Smith; who pretended to translate the Book of Mormon.”
I looked him steadily in the face and replied, “I am sir, the of Joseph smith; but why do you apply to him such epithets as those.”
“Because,” said his reverance, “that he should imagine that he was going to break down all other churches with that simple Mormon Book.”
“Did you ever read that book,” I enquired.
“No,” said he, “it is beneath my notice.” [p. 212]
Page 212