Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ered with blood, (for I hit him on the nose) and with an exu[l]ting  horse laugh, muttered ‘ge gee, God damn ye I’ll fix ye
They then seized me by the throat, and held me till I lost  my breath. After I came to, as they passed along with me, ab out 30 rods from the house I saw stretched out  on the ground, whither they had dragged him by the heels.  I supposed he was dead. I began to plead with them, saying  you will have mercy and spare my life, I hope. To which they  replied “God damn ye, call on yer God for help, we’ll show  you no mercy;” and the people began to show themselves in ev ery direction: one coming from the orchard had a plank, and  I expected they would kill me, and carry me off on a plank.  They turned to the right, and went on about 30 rods further;  about 60 rods from the house, and 30 from where I saw ; into the meadow where they stopped and one said,  , , (meaning I supposed )  pull up his drawers, pull up his drawers he will take cold”  Another replied: a’nt ye going to kill ’im a’nt ye going to  kill ’im? when a group of <mobbers> collected a little way off and said:  , , come here;” and charged those who  had hold of me to keep me from touching the ground, (as they had  done all the time) lest I should get a spring upon them. They  went and held a council, and as I could occasionally overh ear a word, I supposed it was to know whether it was best to  kill me. They returned after a while, when I learned that they  had concluded not to kill me, but to pound me and scratch  me well, tear of[f] my shirt and drawers and leave me mar ked; one cried: “, , where is the tar bucket?”  I don’t know, [illegible] answered one, where ’tis Eli’s left it. They  ran back and fetched the bucket of tar, when one exclaimed  God damn it, let us tar up his mouth;’ and they tried to  force the tar paddle; <into my mouth> I twisted my head around, so that  they could not; and they cried out: “God damn ye, hold up yo ur head and let us give you some tar” They then forced a vial [p. 216]
ered with blood, (for I hit him on the nose) and with an exulting horse laugh, muttered ‘ge gee, God damn ye I’ll fix ye
They then seized me by the throat, and held me till I lost my breath. After I came to, as they passed along with me, about 30 rods from the house I saw stretched out on the ground, whither they had dragged him by the heels. I supposed he was dead. I began to plead with them, saying you will have mercy and spare my life, I hope. To which they replied “God damn ye, call on yer God for help, we’ll show you no mercy;” and the people began to show themselves in every direction: one coming from the orchard had a plank, and I expected they would kill me, and carry me off on a plank. They turned to the right, and went on about 30 rods further; about 60 rods from the house, and 30 from where I saw ; into the meadow where they stopped and one said, “, , (meaning I supposed ) pull up his drawers, pull up his drawers he will take cold” Another replied: a’nt ye going to kill ’im a’nt ye going to kill ’im? when a group of mobbers collected a little way off and said: “, , come here;” and charged those who had hold of me to keep me from touching the ground, (as they had done all the time) lest I should get a spring upon them. They went and held a council, and as I could occasionally overhear a word, I supposed it was to know whether it was best to kill me. They returned after a while, when I learned that they had concluded not to kill me, but to pound me and scratch me well, tear off my shirt and drawers and leave me marked; one cried: “, , where is the tar bucket?” I don’t know, answered one, where ’tis Eli’s left it. They ran back and fetched the bucket of tar, when one exclaimed ‘God damn it, let us tar up his mouth;’ and they tried to force the tar paddle; into my mouth I twisted my head around, so that they could not; and they cried out: “God damn ye, hold up your head and let us give you some tar” They then forced a vial [p. 216]
Page 216