Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 221
image
But, Alas! our joy was soon mingled with woe. It was not <but  a few> two months before a messenger arrived from , with tidings  of the difficulty in : that brothers  and had been tarred and feathered, and put into prison;  that some had been killed and others shot; and among the la tter was who had been dangerously wounded
Upon hearing this, Joseph was overwhelmed with grief;  he burst into tears, and sobbed aloud: “Oh my brethren! my brethren!”  he exclaimed would that I had been with you to have shared  your fate— Oh my God, what shall I do in such a trial as this.
After <his> grief had a little subsided, he called a council; and  it was resolved, that the brethren from the surrounding cou ntry, as well as those in , should go immediately to  , and take with them money and clothing to relieve  the brethren in their distress. Just before this, , my  ’s nephew, and , arrived in  from <> ; and determined to go with the camp to  . He was the son of my s oldest  brother <next younger than himself> of whose peculiar disposition I have spoken before.  Knowing <fearing> that his would censure us, I strove endeavored to  dissuade him from going; but to no purpose, for he was determ ined to be one of the company. After making the necessary col lections, they set out for ; the whole company amount ing to 200 in number.
 

Chapter 43

Chap. 43.
 
builds a school house Joseph and return from  They rehearse the story of their troubles
 
Previous to their taking leave for , the brethren comm [p. 221]
But, Alas! our joy was soon mingled with woe. It was but a few months before a messenger arrived from , with tidings of the difficulty in : that brothers and had been tarred and feathered, and put into prison; that some had been killed and others shot; and among the latter was who had been dangerously wounded
Upon hearing this, Joseph was overwhelmed with grief; he burst into tears, and sobbed aloud: “Oh my brethren! my brethren!” he exclaimed would that I had been with you to have shared your fate— Oh my God, what shall I do in such a trial as this.
After his grief had a little subsided, he called a council; and it was resolved, that the brethren from the surrounding country, as well as those in , should go immediately to , and take with them money and clothing to relieve the brethren in their distress. Just before this, , my ’s nephew, and , arrived in from ; and determined to go with the camp to . He was the son of my s brother next younger than himself fearing that his would censure us, I endeavored to dissuade him from going; but to no purpose, for he was determined to be one of the company. After making the necessary collections, they set out for ; the whole company amounting to 200 in number.
 

Chapter 43

Chap. 43.
 
builds a school houseJoseph and return from They rehearse the story of their troubles
 
Previous to their taking leave for , the brethren comm [p. 221]
Page 221