Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 245
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Chapter 48
Chap. 48.
 
moves with his family to Commencement of the persecution in
 
When we were ready to start on our journey. I went to and brought my to meet his family; and we all proceeded together on our journey, highly delighted to enjoy each others society again, after so long a sepparation.
As soon as we had got fairly started, our sons began to have calls to preach and they directly discovered, that, if they should yield to every solicitation, our journey would be a preaching mission of no inconsiderable length; which was quite inconsistant with the number and situation of our family. They therefore stopped preaching, while on our journey; and we proceeded as fast as possible under the disadvantageous circumstances with which we were sometimes frequently surrounded. Sometimes we lay in our tents through driving storms; at other times we were travelling on foot through marshes and quagmirs.
Once in particular, we lay all night exposed to the rain which fell in torrents; So that, when I arose in the morning, I found that my clothing was perfectly saturated with rain.
However, I could not mend the matter by a change of dress, for the rain was still falling rappidly; and I wore my clothes in this situation three days: In consequence of which I took a severe cold, so that when we arrived at the , I was unable to walk or sit up. After crossing this river, we stopped at a negros hut; a most unlovely place, yet the best shelter we could find. This hut was the birth place of s daughter. <son, Alvin.>
The next day my succeeded in getting a more comfortable place for and her infant daughter, about [p. 245]
Chapter 48
Chap. 48.
 
moves with his family to Commencement of the persecution in
 
When we were ready to start on our journey. I went to and brought my to meet his family; and we all proceeded together on our journey, highly delighted to enjoy each others society again, after so long a sepparation.
As soon as we had got fairly started, our sons began to have calls to preach and they directly discovered, that, if they should yield to every solicitation, our journey would be a preaching mission of no inconsiderable length; which was quite inconsistant with the number and situation of our family. They therefore stopped preaching, while on our journey; and we proceeded as fast as possible under the disadvantageous circumstances with which we were frequently surrounded. Sometimes we lay in our tents through driving storms; at other times we were travelling on foot through marshes and quagmirs.
Once in particular, we lay all night exposed to the rain which fell in torrents; So that, when I arose in the morning, I found that my clothing was perfectly saturated with rain.
However, I could not mend the matter by a change of dress, for the rain was still falling rappidly; and I wore my clothes in this situation three days: In consequence of which I took a severe cold, so that when we arrived at the , I was unable to walk or sit up. After crossing this river, we stopped at a negro hut; a most unlovely place, yet the best shelter we could find. This hut was the birth place of s . son, Alvin.
The next day my succeeded in getting a more comfortable place for and her infant , about [p. 245]
Page 245