Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 247
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she got to she was wet and cold. We put her im mediately into a dry bed; soon after which, she had an ague  fit. The Elders were called to lay hands upon her. After  this she seemed better; but continued weak and inclined  to chills and fever some time.
The day following, I washed a quantity of clothes; af ter which we proceeded on our journey and met with no far ther difficulty on till we arrived at .
We moved into a small log house, having but one room;  a very inconveinient place for a large family. Joseph saw how  uncomfortably we were situated, and proposed that we should  take a large tavern house, which he had recently purchased of  . We took the tavern and moved into it.  , previous to this had moved to a place, called Ma rrowbone. had moved 30 miles in another direction:  we were all now quite comfortable. But this state of affairs  was of short duration; for, it was not long before our peace was  again disturbed by the mob. An Election took place at the county seat of : the brethren went to  the polls as usual, to vote but on attempting to vote they were  forbidden by the mob. They however paid no attention to this ; but proceeded to vote: upon which one of the mob <knocked down one of the brethren> struck  brother a heavy blow; which was returned by  the latter with a force that brought his antagonist to the groun d. Four others came to the assistance of the fallen Man, and  shared the same fate. The mob saw the discomfeiture of their  champions with shame and disapointment, and not choosing to  render them any present help, they waited till evening, when,  procuring the assistance <aid> of the judge of the election, they w rote letters to all the adjoining Counties, begging their assista nce against the Mormons. They stated, that Joseph Smi th had himself killed seven men at the election the day  previous; and that the inhabitants had every reason to ex [p. 247]
she got to she was wet and cold. We put her immediately into a dry bed; soon after which, she had an ague fit. The Elders were called to lay hands upon her. After this she seemed better; but continued weak and inclined to chills and fever some time.
The day following, I washed a quantity of clothes; after which we proceeded on our journey and met with no farther difficulty till we arrived at .
We moved into a small log house, having but one room; a very inconveinient place for a large family. Joseph saw how uncomfortably we were situated, and proposed that we should take a large tavern house, which he had recently purchased of . We took the tavern and moved into it. , previous to this had moved to a place, called Marrowbone. had moved 30 miles in another direction: we were all now quite comfortable. But this state of affairs was of short duration; for, it was not long before our peace was again disturbed by the mob. An Election took place at the county seat of : the brethren went to the polls as usual, but on attempting to vote they were forbidden by the mob. They however paid no attention to this; but proceeded to vote: upon which one of the mob knocked down one of the brethren Four others came to the assistance of the fallen Man, and shared the same fate. The mob saw the discomfeiture of their champions with shame and disapointment, and not choosing to render them any present help, they waited till evening, when, procuring the aid of the judge of the election, they wrote letters to all the adjoining Counties, begging their assistance against the Mormons. They stated, that Joseph Smith had himself killed seven men at the election the day previous; and that the inhabitants had every reason to ex [p. 247]
Page 247