Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 257
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the other authorities, bringing the fatal news, that the Mormons  could have no assistance. They stated that the said,  “the Mormons had got into a difficulty with the citizens, and  they might fight it out for all what he cared: He could not  render them any assistance.”
“The people of were obliged to leave their homes and  and go into ; but did not untill many of them had  starved to death for want of proper sustenance, and several  died on the way road there, and were buried by the way side without  a coffin or a funeral ceremony— and the distress, sufferings, and  privations of the people cannot be expressed. All the scatter ed families of the Mormon people, in all the Counties except  , were driven into , with but few exceptions.
“This only increased their distress; for many thousands who  were driven there, had no habitations nor houses to shelter them,  and were huddled together, some in tents, and others under  blankets, while others had no shelter from the inclemency of  the weather. Nearly two months the people had been in  this awful state of consternation, many of them had been  killed, whilst others had been whipped until they had to sw athe up their bowels to prevent them from falling out. A bout this time <came> out from , Ray County,  who was one of the commissioned officers, who was sent out  to , and I and my brother Joseph Smith  Senior, went out at the same time. On the evening that  the arived at , my brother, the late s , came in to ’s about eleven  O’Clock at night, bringing her two children along with her,  one, about two years and a half old, the other a babe in her  arms. She came on foot, a distance of three miles, and wad ed s, and the water was then about waist  deep, and the snow about 3 inches deep. She stated that a party  of the mob a gang of ruffians had turned her out of doors, had [p. 257]
the other authorities, bringing the fatal news, that the Mormons could have no assistance. They stated that the said, “the Mormons had got into a difficulty with the citizens, and they might fight it out for all what he cared: He could not render them any assistance.”
“The people of were obliged to leave their homes and go into ; but did not untill many of them had starved to death for want of proper sustenance, and several died on the road there, and were buried by the way side without a coffin or a funeral ceremony— and the distress, sufferings, and privations of the people cannot be expressed. All the scattered families of the Mormon people, in all the Counties except , were driven into , with but few exceptions.
“This only increased their distress; for many thousands who were driven there, had no habitations nor houses to shelter them, and were huddled together, some in tents, and others under blankets, while others had no shelter from the inclemency of the weather. Nearly two months the people had been in this awful state of consternation, many of them had been killed, whilst others had been whipped until they had to swathe up their bowels to prevent them from falling out. About this time came out from , Ray County, who was one of the commissioned officers, who was sent out to , and I and my brother Joseph Smith Senior, went out at the same time. On the evening that the arived at , my brother, the late s , came in to ’s about eleven O’Clock at night, bringing her two children along with her, one, about two years and a half old, the other a babe in her arms. She came on foot, a distance of three miles, and waded , and the water was then about waist deep, and the snow about 3 inches deep. She stated that a party of the mob a gang of ruffians had turned her out of doors, had [p. 257]
Page 257