Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 264
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to Slip his halter into to tie his horse to. The was surround ed with a strong guard, and no <man,> woman, or child was permitted to  go out or come in, under the penalty of death. Many of the citizens  were shot in attempting to go out and to obtain subsistance for th emselves and their families. There was one field fenced in consis ting of 1200 acres mostly covered with corn. It was entirely laid  waste by the horses of the army, towards evening came  up from the camp requesting to see my brother Joseph, , , and , stating that the officers of the army wanted a mutual  consultation with those men, also stating that Generals , , and Graham— (however Graham was an ho norable exception: he did all he could to preserve the lives of the  people, contrary to the order of the ,) he, () assured  them that these Generals had pledged their sacred honor that they  should not be abused or insulted; but should be guarded back  in safety in the morning or so soon as the consultation was over.  My brother Joseph replied, that he did not know what good  he could do in any consultation, as he was only a private  individual; however, he said that he was always willing to do all  the good he could, and would obey every law of the land, and  then leave the event with God. They immediately started with   to go down into the camp. As they were going down,  about half way to the camp they met , with a phalanx  of men, with a wing to the right and to the left, and a four po under in the centre. They supposed he was coming with this stro ng force to guard them into the camp in safety— but to their  surprize when they came up to , he ordered his men  to surround them, and stepped up to the and sa id, these are the prisoners I agreed to deliver up” drew  his sword and said, “Gentlemen, you are my prisoners, and abo ut this time the main body of the army were on their march  to meet them. They came up in two divisions, and opened two [p. 264]
to Slip his halter into to tie his horse to. The was surrounded with a strong guard, and no man, woman, or child was permitted to go out or come in, under the penalty of death. Many of the citizens were shot in attempting to go out to obtain subsistance for themselves and their families. There was one field fenced in consisting of 1200 acres mostly covered with corn. It was entirely laid waste by the horses of the army, towards evening came up from the camp requesting to see my brother Joseph, , , and , stating that the officers of the army wanted a mutual consultation with those men, also stating that Generals , , and Graham— (however Graham was an honorable exception: he did all he could to preserve the lives of the people, contrary to the order of the ,) he, () assured them that these Generals had pledged their sacred honor that they should not be abused or insulted; but should be guarded back in safety in the morning or so soon as the consultation was over. My brother Joseph replied, that he did not know what good he could do in any consultation, as he was only a private individual; however, he said that he was always willing to do all the good he could, and would obey every law of the land, and then leave the event with God. They immediately started with to go down into the camp. As they were going down, about half way to the camp they met , with a phalanx of men, with a wing to the right and to the left, and a four pounder in the centre. They supposed he was coming with this strong force to guard them into the camp in safety— but to their surprize when they came up to , he ordered his men to surround them, and stepped up to the and said, these are the prisoners I agreed to deliver up” drew his sword and said, “Gentlemen, you are my prisoners, and about this time the main body of the army were on their march to meet them. They came up in two divisions, and opened [p. 264]
Page 264