Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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were inserted in the subpeona, and thrust them into jail, and we were not permitted to bring one of them before the court, but the turned upon us and said with an air of indignations, “gentlemen, you must get your witnesses or you shall be comitted to jail immediately; for we are not agoing to hold <the> court open for you on expense for you much longer any how.” We felt very much distressed and oppressed at that time. said what shall we do, our winesses are all thrust into prison, and probably will be and we have no power to do any thing, of course we must submit to this tyranny and oppression; we cannot help our selves. Several others made simular expressions in the agony of their souls; but my brother Joseph did not say any thing, he being sick with the tooth-acke, and ague in his face, in consequence of a severe cold brought on by being exposed to the severity of the weather. However it was considered best by and , that we should try to get some witnesses before the pretended court. Accordingly, I myself gave the names of about 20 20 other persons; the inserted them in his subpeona, and caused it to be placed into the hands of the Methodist priest, and he again started off with his 50 soldiers to take these men prisoners, as he had done to the 40 others. The sat and laughed at the good opportunity of getting the names, that they might the more easily capture them, and so bring them down to be thrust into prison, in order to prevent us from getting the truth before the pretended court, of which himself was the chief inquisitor or conspirator. returned from his second expedition with one prisoner only, whom he als[o] thrust into prison.
The people at had learned the intrigue and had left the , having been made acquainted with the former treatment of the former witnesses. But we, on learning that we could not obtain witnesses, whilst privately consulting with each other what we should do, discovered a Mr Allen, standing by the window on the outside of the house, we beckoned to [p. 271]
were inserted in the subpeona, and thrust them into jail, and we were not permitted to bring one of them before the court, but the turned upon us and said with an air of indignations, “gentlemen, you must get your witnesses or you shall be comitted to jail immediately; for we are not agoing to hold the court open on expense for you much longer any how.” We felt very much distressed and oppressed at that time. said what shall we do, our winesses are all thrust into prison, and probably will be and we have no power to do any thing, of course we must submit to this tyranny and oppression; we cannot help our selves. Several others made simular expressions in the agony of their souls; but my brother Joseph did not say any thing, he being sick with the tooth-acke, and ague in his face, in consequence of a severe cold brought on by being exposed to the severity of the weather. However it was considered best by and , that we should try to get some witnesses before the pretended court. Accordingly, I myself gave the names of about 20 other persons; the inserted them in his subpeona, and caused it to be placed into the hands of the Methodist priest, and he again started off with his 50 soldiers to take these men prisoners, as he had done to the 40 others. The sat and laughed at the good opportunity of getting the names, that they might the more easily capture them, and so bring them down to be thrust into prison, in order to prevent us from getting the truth before the pretended court, of which himself was the chief inquisitor or conspirator. returned from his second expedition with one prisoner only, whom he also thrust into prison.
The people at had learned the intrigue and had left the , having been made acquainted with the treatment of the former witnesses. But we, on learning that we could not obtain witnesses, whilst privately consulting with each other what we should do, discovered a Mr Allen, standing by the window on the outside of the house, we beckoned to [p. 271]
Page 271