Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of great enterprise, energetick in business. and possessed  of a high degree of patriotism, he launched forth  on the frontiers at in the year 1800; (if I rec ollect right;) where he immediately commenced tra ding with the Indians. He left his family in  Tunbridge on his farm; and while he was engaged  in business at he visited them, sometimes  once a year, eighteen months, and two years— just  as it happened.
“I visited Nov. 1st 1820. where I found  the Maj. merchandizing upon quite an extensive scale;  having six clerks in one store; besides this he had  many other stores in the ; as well  as stores in various parts of . His business  at Pontiac, was principally farming and building; but  in order to facilitate these two branches of business  he set in opperation, a saw and grist mill, and  afterwards added the different branches of mechan ism. He made the turnpike from to Pon tiac at his own expense. He also did considerable  other <public> work for the purpose of giving employment to the  poor. He never encouraged idleness or the man  above his business. ¶ In 1828, having been absent  from a short time I returned: the Maj. was  then a member of the council of the , in which  he had acted a very conspicuous part in enhancing  its prosperity and enlarging its settlement; and it was  a common saying, that he had done much more for  the than any other individual:— in short  the Maj. was a man of talents of the first order:  he was energetick and entiring; and always enc ouraging industry. And he was verry cautious how  he applied his acts of charity.
Respectfully by
Horace Stanly [p. 21]
of great enterprise, energetick in business. and possessed of a high degree of patriotism, he launched forth on the frontiers at in the year 1800; (if I recollect right;) where he immediately commenced trading with the Indians. He left his family in Tunbridge on his farm; and while he was engaged in business at he visited them, sometimes once a year, eighteen months, and two years— just as it happened.
“I visited Nov. 1st 1820. where I found the Maj. merchandizing upon quite an extensive scale; having six clerks in one store; besides this he had many other stores in the ; as well as stores in various parts of . His business at Pontiac, was principally farming and building; but in order to facilitate these two branches of business he set in opperation, a saw and grist mill, and afterwards added the different branches of mechanism. He made the turnpike from to Pontiac at his own expense. He also did considerable other public work for the purpose of giving employment to the poor. He never encouraged idleness or the man above his business. ¶ In 1828, having been absent from a short time I returned: the Maj. was then a member of the council of the , in which he had acted a very conspicuous part in enhancing its prosperity and enlarging its settlement; and it was a common saying, that he had done much more for the than any other individual:— in short the Maj. was a man of talents of the first order: he was energetick and entiring; and always encouraging industry. And he was verry cautious how he applied his acts of charity.
Respectfully by
Horace Stanly [p. 21]
Page 21