Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 279
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Chapter 50
Chap. 50.
 
Removal of the Smith family to
 
At the time when and Joseph went into the enemy’s camp, and stood in the door of the house in which we were living; and could distinctly hear horrid yellings. Not knowing the cause, we supposed they were murdering him, Soon after the screaming commenced, five or six guns were discharged. At this , folding his arms tight across his breast, cried out, “Oh my God! my God! they have murdered killed my son! the[y] have murdered him! and I too must die, for I cannot live without him!!
I had no word of consolation to give him; for my heart was broken within me— my agony was unuterable. I assisted him to the bed and he fell back upon it as helpless as a child, for he had not strength to stand upon his feet. The shrieking continued— no tounge can describe the sound which was conveyed to our ears— no heart can immagine the sensations of our breasts as we listened to those awful screams: had the army been composed of so many blood hounds wolves, and panthers, they could not have made a sound more terrible
My was immediately taken sick, and never afterwards entirely recovered; yet he lived about two years, and was occasionally quite comfortable and able to attend meetings [14 words illegible] You have seen by the testimony of that he was taken by the officers the next day. After he arrived at the camp, he was seated with Joseph on a log which was placed there for the purpose before they he was taken The soldiers crowded around, and swearing that they would shoot them, snapped several guns at them, for their protection. At length Captain Martin ordered his men to surround the prisoners [p. 279]
Chapter 50
Chap. 50.
 
Removal of the Smith family to
 
At the time when
I had no word of consolation to give him; for my heart was broken within me— my agony was unuterable. I assisted him to the bed and he fell back upon it as helpless as a child, for he had not strength to stand upon his feet. The shrieking continued— no tounge can describe the sound which was conveyed to our ears— no heart can immagine the sensations of our breasts as we listened to those awful screams: had the army been composed of so many blood hounds wolves, and panthers, they could not have made a sound more terrible
My was immediately taken sick, and never afterwards entirely recovered; yet he lived about two years, and was occasionally quite comfortable and able to attend meetings You have seen by the testimony of that he was taken by the officers the next day. After he arrived at the camp, he was seated with Joseph on a log which was placed there for the purpose before he was taken The soldiers crowded around, and swearing that they would shoot them, snapped several guns at them, for their protection. At length Captain Martin ordered his men to surround the prisoners [p. 279]
Page 279