Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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not all, the news came to her ears, that they were about to burn another establishment belonging to the Maj. and without waiting to consult him, she went immediately to the store, and took from the counting room several thousand dollars; which she secreted until the Brittish left the city: the building and goods were burned.
As some as the english left the , he recommenced business; and moved his family to . Here they remained but a short time, when he took them to Pontiac; and, as soon as they were well established, or settled in business this place, he himself went to the city of ; where he built a saw-mill. But, in the midst of his prosperity he was called away to experience another state of existence with barely a moments warning; for, he was sick only four days from the time he was first taken; and even on the fourth day, and in the last hour of his illness, he was not supposed to be at all dangerous until his son, who sat by his bed-side discovered that he was dying.
He left his family with an estate of $50 000,00 clear of encumbrance. He was a moral man and a man of business; besides he was a man of great courage and resolution, which he fully manifested in the defence of his .
 
Chapter 5
Chap. 5.
 
A sketch of the life of Lydia Mack
 
Of my sister Lydia I shall say but little; not that I loved her less, or that she was less deserving of honorable mention; but she seemed to float more with [p. 23]
not all, the news came to her ears, that they were about to burn another establishment belonging to the Maj. and without waiting to consult him, she went immediately to the store, and took from the counting room several thousand dollars; which she secreted until the Brittish left the city: the building and goods were burned.
As some as the english left the , he recommenced business; and moved his family to . Here they remained but a short time, when he took them to Pontiac; and, as soon as they were well established, or settled in this place, he himself went to the city of ; where he built a saw-mill. But, in the midst of his prosperity he was called away to experience another state of existence with barely a moments warning; for, he was sick only four days from the time he was first taken; and even on the fourth day, and in the last hour of his illness, he was not supposed to be at all dangerous until his son, who sat by his bed-side discovered that he was dying.
He left his family with an estate of $50 000,00 clear of encumbrance. He was a moral man and a man of business; besides he was a man of great courage and resolution, which he fully manifested in the defence of his .
 
Chapter 5
Chap. 5.
 
A sketch of the life of Lydia Mack
 
Of my sister Lydia I shall say but little; not that I loved her less, or that she was less deserving of honorable mention; but she seemed to float more with [p. 23]
Page 23