Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 302
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greatest grief, which it was possible for me to feel, had fallen  upon me in the death of my beloved : although that  portion of my life which lay before me seemed to be a lone some trackless waste, yet I did not think that I possible  find in travelling over it, a sorrow more searching, or  a calamity more dreadful, than the present. But, as I  hasten to the end of my story, the reader will be able to  form an opinion with regard to the correctness of conclusi on.
 

Chapter 53

Chap. 53.
 
Joseph arrested at discharged at  Monmouth Joseph charged with an attem pt to assassinate
 
In the month of Decmber 1840 we received for , a city Charter with extensive prviledges; and in Feb ruary of the same winter charters were also recived for the   Legion, and for the University of the city of
Not long after this, the officer of Lieutenant General  was conferred upon Joseph, by the vote of the people < Legion> and a  <was> commission<ed> from <by> the . In the early part of the sa me, I made brother Knowlton a visit on Bear-Creek. While  there I had the misfortune to sprain one of my knees, in get ting out of a wagon; and a cold settling in the injured part,  rheumatism succeeded. Soon after I returned home, I was con fined to my bed; and for six weeks I had watchers every [p. 302]
greatest grief, which it was possible for me to feel, had fallen upon me in the death of my beloved : although that portion of my life which lay before me seemed to be a lonesome trackless waste, yet I did not think that I possible find in travelling over it, a sorrow more searching, or a calamity more dreadful, than the present. But, as I hasten to the end of my story, the reader will be able to form an opinion with regard to the correctness of conclusion.
 

Chapter 53

Chap. 53.
 
Joseph arrested at discharged at Monmouth
 
In the month of Decmber 1840 we received for , a city Charter with extensive prviledges; and in February of the same winter charters were also recived for the Legion, and for the University of the city of
Not long after this, the officer of Lieutenant General was conferred upon Joseph, by the vote of the Legion and commission from the . In the early part of the same, I made brother Knowlton a visit on Bear-Creek. While there I had the misfortune to sprain one of my knees, in getting out of a wagon; and a cold settling in the injured part, rheumatism succeeded. Soon after I returned home, I was confined to my bed; and for six weeks I had watchers every [p. 302]
Page 302