Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 311
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mob to the . At this the came into the midst of the mob, and asked them if they would stand by him in executing and defending the law. They said they would; and so he organized them into militia, and then demanded the bretheren for trial, upon the warrant issued by Smith; (as he did not choose to recognize the right of habeas corpus, granted us in our charter.); at the same time he pledged the faith of the , that the bretheren should be protected from mob violence.
Those called for in the warrant, made their appearance at , June 24th, 1844. On the morning of the 25th, Joseph and were arrested by or with a warrant founded upon the oath of H. O Norton and for treason.— I will not dwell upon the awful scene which succeeded: My heart is thrilled with grief and indignation, and my blood curdles in my veins whenever I speak of it.
My sons were thrown into jail, where they remained three days, in company with brothers , and , and . At the end of this time, the disbanded the most of the men; but left a guard of eight of our bitterest enemies over the jail, and sixty more of the same character about a hundred yards distant. He then came into with a guard of 50 or 60 men— made a short speech, and returned immediately. During his absence from the guard rushed out of the place at the point of the bayonet. Soon after this 200 of those discharged in the mo [p. 311]
mob to the . At this the came into the midst of the mob, and asked them if they would stand by him in executing and defending the law. They said they would; and so he organized them into militia, and then demanded the bretheren for trial, upon the warrant issued by Smith; (as he did not choose to recognize the right of habeas corpus, granted us in our charter.); at the same time he pledged the faith of the , that the bretheren should be protected from mob violence.
Those called for in the warrant, made their appearance at , June 24th, 1844. On the morning of the 25th, Joseph and were arrested with a warrant founded upon the oath of H. O Norton and for treason.— I will not dwell upon the awful scene which succeeded: My heart is thrilled with grief and indignation, and my blood curdles in my veins whenever I speak of it.
My sons were thrown into jail, where they remained three days, in company with brothers , , and . At the end of this time, the disbanded the most of the men; but left a guard of eight of our bitterest enemies over the jail, and sixty more of the same character about a hundred yards distant. He then came into with a guard of 50 or 60 men— made a short speech, and returned immediately. During his absence from the guard rushed out of the place at the point of the bayonet. Soon after this 200 of those discharged in the mo [p. 311]
Page 311