Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 314
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he had been broken of his rest, and being was dredfully  fatigued in the Chase; this joined to the shock  occasioned by his brother’s death, brought on a  disease that never was removed.
On the following days, the funeral rites of  the murdered ones were attended to, in the midst  of terror and alarm; for the mob had made  their arrangements to burn the that night; But,  by the dilligence of the bretheren, they were kept at  bay till they became discouraged; and returned  to their homes.
In a short time , who continued unwell,  was confined to his bed; and lingering till the 30th  of July, his spirit forsook its earthly tabernacle,  and went to join his brothers, and the ancient mar tyrs in the Paradise of God.
At this time was absent on a mission  to the Eastern States. And he had taken his fam ily with him, in consequence of his wife being  afflicted with the dropsy; hoping that the jour ney might be a benefit to her. Thus, I left des olate in my distress— I had reared six sons to  manhood, and of them all one only remained; and  he was too far distant to speak one consoling word  to me in this trying hour. It would have been some  satisfaction to me, if I had expected his immedi ate return; but his wife was lying at the point of  death, which compelled him to remain where he was.  But his case was, if it were possible, worse than mine;  for he had to bear all his grief alone in a land  of strangers, confined to the side of his dying wife, and  absent from those, who felt the deepest interest in his  welfare; whilst I was surrounded with friends, being [p. 314]
he had been broken of his rest, and was dredfully fatigued in the Chase; this joined to the shock occasioned by his brother’s death, brought on a disease that never was removed.
On the following days, the funeral rites of the murdered ones were attended to, in the midst of terror and alarm; for the mob had made their arrangements to burn the that night; But, by the dilligence of the bretheren, they were kept at bay till they became discouraged; and returned to their homes.
In a short time , who continued unwell, was confined to his bed; and lingering till the 30th of July, his spirit forsook its earthly tabernacle, and went to join his brothers, and the ancient martyrs in the Paradise of God.
At this time was absent on a mission to the Eastern States. And he had taken his family with him, in consequence of his wife being afflicted with the dropsy; hoping that the journey might be a benefit to her. Thus, I left desolate in my distress— I had reared six sons to manhood, and of them all one only remained; and he was too far distant to speak one consoling word to me in this trying hour. It would have been some satisfaction to me, if I had expected his immediate return; but his wife was lying at the point of death, which compelled him to remain where he was. But his case was, if it were possible, worse than mine; for he had to bear all his grief alone in a land of strangers, confined to the side of his dying wife, and absent from those, who felt the deepest interest in his welfare; whilst I was surrounded with friends, being [p. 314]
Page 314