Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 319
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Whilst waiting for this boat we had an interview with  : he had not confidence to look us  in the face; for he had become our enemy; yet,  when we parted, he shook hands with us quite  cordially, and wished us success.
On the 30th of September, we went on board  the Konsas, which was a very slow conveyance; for  one of the wheels was broken; besides this, the river  was very low, and full of snags and sand bars,  and we got along but slowly on our journey. Here  we travelled in company with , and ; besides many others, who had taken an ac tive part in the expulsion of the Saints from in 1833. was also on  board. On arriving at we found abo ut 70 of the bretheren with their families, surround ed by a mob of 200 men. When landed the boat landed  the women and children were much frightened, sup posing that we also were mob. We would have  stopped and assisted them what we could, but we  were unarmed; and, upon consulting togeth[er], it was  thought advisable for us to fulfill our mission; so  we returned to the boat, and proceeded on our jou rney. From this onward the Mormons were the  only subject of conversation; and nothing was heard  but the most bitter imprecations against them. related many of his deeds of noble daring in  the mob; one of which was the following:  “I went, said he, in company with 40 others, to the  house of one , who was a mormon in  — we got logs and broke in every door  and window at the same instant; and pointing our  rifles at the family, we told them, we would be [p. 319]
Whilst waiting for this boat we had an interview with : he had not confidence to look us in the face; for he had become our enemy; yet, when we parted, he shook hands with us quite cordially, and wished us success.
On the 30th of September, we went on board the Konsas, which was a very slow conveyance; for one of the wheels was broken; besides this, the river was very low, and full of snags and sand bars, and we got along but slowly on our journey. Here we travelled in company with , and ; besides many others, who had taken an active part in the expulsion of the Saints from in 1833. was also on board. On arriving at we found about 70 of the bretheren with their families, surrounded by a mob of 200 men. When the boat landed the women and children were much frightened, supposing that we also were mob. We would have stopped and assisted them what we could, but we were unarmed; and, upon consulting together, it was thought advisable for us to fulfill our mission; so we returned to the boat, and proceeded on our journey. From this onward the Mormons were the only subject of conversation; and nothing was heard but the most bitter imprecations against them. related many of his deeds of noble daring in the mob; one of which was the following: “I went, said he, in company with 40 others, to the house of one , who was a mormon in — we got logs and broke in every door and window at the same instant; and pointing our rifles at the family, we told them, we would be [p. 319]
Page 319