Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Hampshire; where he is still living. And, although he is  now <71> years old, he has never travelled farther than  ; to which his business leads him twice a year.
He has gathered to himself in this <that> rockey region  fields, flocks, and herds; which multiply and  increase upon the mountains. He has been known  at lea[s]t twenty years, as Cap. Solomon Mack  of Gilsum. But as he lives to speak for him self, and, as I [illegible] speak <have to do> chiefly with the dead,  and not the living I shall leave him, hoping, as  he has lived peaceably with all men, he may die  happy.
I have now given a brief account of all of my  ’s family save myself; and what I have  written has been done with the view of discharging  an obligation, which I considered as resting upon  me, inasmuch as they have all passed off the  stage of action except myself and youngest brother.  And seldom do I meet with an individual with whom  I was ever acquainted in my early years; and I am  constrained to exclaim: the friends of my youth,  where are they? The tomb replies, “here are they; but,  through my instrumentality,
“Safely truth to urge her claims presumes
On names now found alone on books and tombs”
 
Chapter 8
Chap. 8.
 
Early life of her marriage  with
 
I shall now introduce to the attention of my rea ders the history of my own life: I was born in [p. 26]
Hampshire; where he is still living. And, although he is now 71 years old, he has never travelled farther than ; to which his business leads him twice a year.
He has gathered to himself in that rockey region fields, flocks, and herds; which multiply and increase upon the mountains. He has been known at least twenty years, as Cap. Solomon Mack of Gilsum. But as he lives to speak for himself, and, as I have to do chiefly with the dead, and not the living I shall leave him, hoping, as he has lived peaceably with all men, he may die happy.
I have now given a brief account of all of my ’s family save myself; and what I have written has been done with the view of discharging an obligation, which I considered as resting upon me, inasmuch as they have all passed off the stage of action except myself and youngest brother. And seldom do I meet with an individual with whom I was ever acquainted in my early years; and I am constrained to exclaim: the friends of my youth, where are they? The tomb replies, “here are they; but, through my instrumentality,
“Safely truth to urge her claims presumes
On names now found alone on books and tombs”
 
Chapter 8
Chap. 8.
 
Early life of her marriage with
 
I shall now introduce to the attention of my readers the history of my own life: I was born in [p. 26]
Page 26