Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 328
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and asked the Lord to spare her, that I might see her again in the flesh. But when I left I felt as though she would be taken before I returned, which caused me to feel sorrowful; but I do not desire to call her back to this world of trouble. I must close by saying that I expect to labor in the vineyard until I start for home. And, if the Lord will I shall see you, as soon as the last of July:— then then I shall finish this letter.
Yours till death
 
In the month of June 1839. came from to for the purpose of making preparations to establish a printing press. As the press and type had been burried during the troubles, and were considerably injured by the dampness which they had gathered, it was necessary to get them into use as soon as possible: and in order to this, was under the necessity of cleaning out a cellar through which a spring was constantly flowing; for there was no other place at liberty, where he could put up the press. The dampness of the place, together with his labor, caused him to take a severe cold, with which he was sick some time; nevertheless he continued his labor until he got the press into opperation, and issued one No, of the paper. He then went to to visit his family after which he returned to ; but found the distress so great that no business could be done. Upon his arrival in he wrote to his the following letter; which shows [p. 328]
and asked the Lord to spare her, that I might see her again in the flesh. But when I left I felt as though she would be taken before I returned, which caused me to feel sorrowful; but I do not desire to call her back to this world of trouble. I must close by saying that I expect to labor in the vineyard until I start for home. And, if the Lord will I shall see you, as soon as the last of July:— then then I shall finish this letter.
Yours till death
 
In the month of June 1839. came from to for the purpose of making preparations to establish a printing press. As the press and type had been burried during the troubles, and were considerably injured by the dampness which they had gathered, it was necessary to get them into use as soon as possible: and in order to this, was under the necessity of cleaning out a cellar through which a spring was constantly flowing; for there was no other place at liberty, where he could put up the press. The dampness of the place, together with his labor, caused him to take a severe cold, with which he was sick some time; nevertheless he continued his labor until he got the press into opperation, and issued one No, of the paper. He then went to to visit his family after which he returned to ; but found the distress so great that no business could be done. Upon his arrival in he wrote to his the following letter; which shows [p. 328]
Page 328